Tagged With withings

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There's never been a better time to utilise technology for health and fitness purposes. Fitness trackers are, by far, the most common piece of wearable tech available, letting you track your movement and activity as you go about your business – and all you have to do is remember to charge it and put it on in the morning.

But the fact that they're so common is somewhat of a downside, since, as a consumer, it can be difficult sorting the good from the bad. How do you know which ones are actually worth going out and buying? That's why we took a look a seven of the latest trackers from big-name companies to work out which ones are worth getting your hands on.

1

Despite the name, smartwatches can be kind of dumb. Sure, they can do cool things, like control your music and put notifications on your wrist. But battery life woes and underwhelming platforms leave you questioning the real IQ of these supposedly "smart" devices. However, there is a road less travelled: an area unexplored by big tech giants, where people can revel in functioning wristputers without being stuck in a technological mire.

3

Fitness trackers that hang off your wrist are useful for accurate step counting, but if you also like to wear a watch, they can get in the way. Every bit as accurate and significantly more convenient is a clip-on tracker that you can hook around a belt loop or bra strap. The only problem? Most don't really tell you how you're doing with your fitness goals. The Withings Go is a small, clip-on fitness tracker that'll show your daily step progress, and double as an analog watch, with an 88-segment always-on circular e-ink display.

0

At this year's CES, we found out that one of the most attractive (and expensive) fitness trackers out there was going to come in an affordable form: the Withings Activité Pop. The catch? It was iOS only. But no more! Withings has announced both the $US400 and $US150 versions (there is no word on local availability just yet, but those prices translate to $515 and $193 in Aussie dollars) of its watch-based fitness tracker are coming to Android.

1

This year's CES is flooded with fitness trackers, and there are hundreds more waiting in the wings. But what's set the most interesting ones apart isn't price. It's design. The fitness tracker and the watch are converging, in the best possible way. And faster than you might have thought.

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Like many of you, I work in front of a computer. They're powerful devices, but they also suck your will to live and trick you into never, ever getting up and going outside. Reasons like that are why fitness trackers were invented.

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Designing an electronic device to wake someone up is easy — it just needs a clock and suitably loud speaker. But designing a device that wakes someone up gently so they're not a tyrant in the morning, and helps them get to sleep at night? That's a challenge that Withings tackled with its new Aura bedside system that uses light and sound to make falling asleep and waking up a lot easier.

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This year has produced a flood of fitness trackers and, as such, it takes more than it has in the past to stand out from the crowd. The unassuming Withings Pulse has a neat trick up its sleeve that just might do it: In addition to all the usual stuff, it can take your pulse.