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After a brief holiday hiatus, Toy Aisle makes its triumphant return with an exclusive first look at a new collectable from DC Comics that fans of The New Teen Titans will want to start saving for. We also have the easiest way to build your own ship-in-a-bottle courtesy of LEGO, and something for Star Trek: Discovery fans looking to recreate epic Federation vs. Klingon space battles at their desks, instead of actually working.

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On February 19 in the US, Star Wars: Rebels will begin the second half of its fourth and final season, which will hopefully answer all (or at least some) of the questions we've had about the series since day one. Now, we have a new trailer for those episodes - and with it, predictably, come even more questions. Thankfully, we got Rebels' executive producer Dave Filoni on the phone to get to the bottom of them.

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Despite reports to the contrary, Facebook is not currently developing a way to filter spoilers. The idea came from a quote attributed to Ricky Van Veen, head of global creative strategy for Facebook, speaking at the National Association of Television Program Executives. From that information, Deadline and other outlets reported Facebook was working on a filter which would remove spoilers from a user's newsfeed. However, the quote misses a key element.

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In 2016, a large clinical trial of a male contraceptive injection was stopped early, after men reported more side effects than expected, including serious emotional problems and mood swings -- one volunteer even committed suicide during the study. Now, the authors of a paper in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry say they have stumbled onto another potential male contraceptive, derived from a plant hunters in Africa have long used to create poison-tipped arrows.

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I won't be satisfied with the robotics industry until I can send a swarm of nanobots to devour my enemies and turn them into fashionable singlets. While science plugs away at that problem, cool droids like the milliDelta from Harvard's School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) will have to do. The robot is around 15mm², but can move with a degree of speed and precision that blows the pants off everything that's come before it.

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By using an artificially intelligent algorithm to predict patient mortality, a research team from Stanford University is hoping to improve the timing of end-of-life care for critically ill patients. In tests, the system proved eerily accurate, correctly predicting mortality outcomes in 90 per cent of cases. But while the system is able to predict when a patient might die, it still cannot tell doctors how it came to its conclusion.

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We've been counting down the 100 most important moments in pop culture all week. And at last, we've reached the end: The top 20. These are the biggest, most monumental events, decisions, releases and more that have left indelible marks (usually for better, sometimes for worse, and some remain to be seen) on nerd culture since January 2008.