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The Google Pixel 2 has the best camera of any smartphone. This much we already know to be true. It also has an excellent portrait mode for blurring the background in photos, but it doesn't use two camera lenses to do that like the iPhone or Samsung Galaxy Note8. Instead, it uses some very smart software and machine learning, and the minute difference between the pixels in its camera sensor, to simulate blur that looks very nearly as good as a much larger and more expensive digital SLR.

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The US National Chicken Council and some Republican lawmakers want to kill rules that limit how many chicken carcasses poultry plants can process per minute, and they're hoping President Donald Trump's disdain for Obama-era red-tape will help them feed America's growing bird-blood lust.

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Voltron: Legendary Defender's fourth season is weird. A mere six episodes long (after a normal-length season was split to create the show's third and fourth), at times it feels like it's been cobbled together out of a season we never got to see the rest of. Yet despite that, it delivers some hugely satisfying stories fans have been itching to see since the show began.

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Star Trek: Discovery is in a hot spot. The latest episode, "Choose Your Pain," was indeed painful, but mainly because of the choices it made -- especially regarding Captain Lorca's actions. We take look at why Lorca chose to leave a man behind for spite, as well as expose Ash Tyler's secret motives and discuss how the relatively obscure Eugenics Wars factor in this season. You can watch the video below.

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I've been reading DC's Dark Nights: Metal with one eyebrow perpetually raised; something about the concept of the event and its aesthetics just weren't clicking into place for me. But then I talked to a friend, who told me that the key to Metal was understanding that DC's been in the process of deconstructing the idea of Batman -- those parts of Batman that aren't just dark and moody, but are legitimately destructive and unhealthy.

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It's understandable that UAV enthusiasts might be tempted to grab amazing footage of ongoing disasters like the northern California wildfires -- providing a unique perspective of a climate change-fuelled catastrophe which has now killed at least 41 people, burned down thousands of buildings and laid waste to hundreds of thousands of acres of land.

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Malcolm Turnbull has again pushed the idea of a "technology neutral" approach to energy policy, after scrapping the Clean Energy Target recommended by Australia's Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel, which Tony Abbott had previously referred to as a "tax on coal". The CET will now be replaced with a National Energy Guarantee, with a focus on reducing power bills and guaranteeing reliability through focusing on so-called "dispatchable" generation.

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Humans and dogs have a long history of working together, leading to the assumption that the collaborative abilities of dogs are the result of domestication. New research suggests this isn't the case, and that wolves are far better at cooperation than their domesticated cousins, at least when they're cooperating with one another.

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Imagine an animal with the body of a chameleon, the feet and claws of an anteater, the humped back of a camel, and a tail that is both flattened like a beaver's, but also like that of a scorpion. If you're thinking this sounds like someone just threw your local zoo into a blender -- or that it's not far off from mythical creatures like the chimera or manticore -- this would be understandable. But this bonkers description fits a real, long-extinct group of tree-dwelling reptiles that lived more than 200 million years ago. Now, a new species of these freaky little critters has been identified, and its fossilized remains pile onto the anatomical strangeness, showing that this ancient reptile evolved a toothless, remarkably bird-like head in a world 100 million years before birds with heads like this even existed.