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When a 5m tall wooden sculpture was installed in the FBI's Miami field office in 2015, the US government thought it was getting a great deal. The General Services Administration (GSA) commissioned the work and estimated that it was "likely worth more than the $750,000 the government paid." But it's currently sitting in storage in Maryland. Why? The sculpture got over a dozen FBI agents seriously sick.

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We've all stolen things from work — pencils, pens, maybe a notebook — but this Foxconn employee went a little too far. According to AsiaOne, a former senior manager at the world's largest electronics maker and assembler was charged with stealing and selling 5700 iPhones for a value of about $US1.56 million ($2 million).

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The CW's four-part DC crossover event is over, as the combined forces of Supergirl, Arrow, The Flash and Legends of Tomorrow defeated the alien Dominators. But saving the Earth wasn't their only achievement — they also managed to turn Barry Allen into a hero again, fixing the DC/CW universe's worst problem, while still provided the most fun superhero TV of the year.

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In case you thought we'd figured out life in the oceans even a little bit, a new study published in Nature Communications sets the record straight. For the first time, scientists have found experimental evidence of underwater pollination. There are bees in the sea — or at least creatures that perform the same kind of work.

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It's practically summer. Why go outside and sweat through the heat when you can stay in and read? This guide to December's most exciting book releases proves you have plenty of great options to choose from. And if you're still looking for a holiday gift for your favourite bookworm (or Archer fiend, or Star Wars junkie), you'll find some excellent suggestions right here.

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The world's leading gravitational wave detector is back online and better than ever. After a series of upgrades, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (Advanced LIGO) switched on yesterday. Physicists are already stoked about the cosmic collisions they're going to measure during its next six-month run.