transportation

How NYT Magazine Made A 45m Pedestrian For Its Walking Issue

It’s like Christmas morning for pedestrian advocates! This week’s New York Times Magazine is all about walking, from the very act of perambulation to all the ways that the city — any city really — is best appreciated on foot. And the cover is a street-scale work of art.


That Time The US Postal Service Actually Used Gyrocopters To Deliver Mail

When a Florida mailman landed a gyrocopter with a USPS logo on the lawn of the Capitol today, I’m sure you were asking yourself the same question I was: Does the US postal service really deliver mail via gyrocopter? Not today. But it turns out they did, back in the 1930s.


Boeing's New 737 MAX Is About To Make Flying A Little Less Horrible

Two incremental but important changes — wider seats and redesigned bins — have been announced for Boeing’s new 737 MAX, which will take to the skies in 2017. This isn’t just about passenger comfort either. The changes are also intended to make flying a lot more affordable.


8 Stunning, Award-Winning Urban Structures

From a bridge that makes walking an adventure to a cost-effective way to revitalise an ageing port, Architizer’s A+ Awards announced yesterday include smart and simple architecture for everyday life. Here are a few public structures that make grand statements about our changing cities or solve a universal problem in a beautiful way.


These New Parking Signs Are Brilliant, And Every City Should Copy Them

In the quest to make parking suck less, there are apps that help you find a space, and meters where you can pay with a swipe of your credit card. But Los Angeles has launched a simple, low-tech solution to make parking better: well-designed signage that offers no ambiguity whatsoever when it comes to where you can park, when you can park there, and how much it will cost.


Was This The Plexiglass Car Of The Future In 1952?

If you’re a fan of olde-timey futuristic cars you may have seen the photo above pulsating through your streams this weekend. Is it really what people of 1952 thought cars of the future would look like? Not exactly. But it’s still really cool!


Flying SUX! The Weirdest Stories Behind Our Airport Codes

You see them everywhere: On highway signs, plane tickets, and even humblebraggy Twitter updates. Some are obvious and some make no sense. But what do these three-letter airport codes really mean?


Would You Take The Bus If It Earned You Free Credits For Tolls?

There’s a running joke in many American cities: The only way to make public transportation truly work would be to pay people to ride it. In Atlanta, that’s kind of what a new pilot program is doing. For certain transit trips, passengers can now earn $US2 — but they can only use the money to pay tolls on a nearby highway. Is this the best/worst idea to provide congestion relief?


Museum Giving Away Back To The Future Car

We’re still waiting on many of the futuristic technologies from Back to the Future: Part II. We don’t have Marty’s hoverboard, Doc’s electronic technology that puts you to sleep, or the government’s total weather control. But you might have a chance to win Doc Brown’s DeLorean — provided the Cubs win the World Series.


This Cartoon Perfectly Sums Up The Optimism Of 1950s Futurism

The December 28, 1959 issue of Life magazine featured this illustration of life in 1975. It’s over the top and cartoonish, of course, but it perfectly sums up all of the techno-optimism that was so prevalent in the late 1950s — the Golden Age of Futurism.