Tagged With transportation

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Earlier today, an American Airlines plane with 170 people aboard caught fire at O'Hare Airport in Chicago. Everyone was evacuated alive, though there are some minor injuries. But now a second plane, this one operated by FedEx, has exploded at the Ft Lauderdale airport in Florida.

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Engineers in Tokyo are attempting to build a flying car that will help light the Olympic cauldron in 2020. And even though they still have a few years, it's a race against time to achieve what so many other flying car designers have failed to do: Build a safe and reliable flying machine that can handle both the skies and the roads.

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Everything felt great, until I found myself skating halfway down the steep side of the Williamsburg Bridge with the Boosted Board throttle cranked to the max. I was going too fast, and I knew it. So I dropped a foot — a dumb thing to do.

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This "electric carriage" which appeared in the 27 July 1889 issue of Scientific American was way ahead of its time. How ahead of its time was it? South Dakota wasn't even a state yet. The article that went along with it noted that the patent for this ingenious contraption was granted to one Mr Harvey D. Dibble of Rapid City, Dakota Territory.

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Of the seven cities chosen as finalists for the US Department of Transportation's Smart City Challenge, Columbus, Ohio may have seemed like the underdog. (It was the only finalist that has no rail system whatsoever.) But last week, USDOT announced Columbus as the winner of over $US50 million ($67 million) in cash that will transform its transportation system into one of the most forward-looking in the country.

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A recent survey shows that people want self-driving cars to be programmed to minimise casualties during an accident, even if it causes the death of the rider. Trouble is, the same survey shows that people don't actually want to ride in cars that are programmed this way. That's obviously a problem — and we're going to have to get over it.

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Last year, NASA casually announced its intention to disrupt the aviation industry by sticking fully electric commercial passenger planes in the sky in 20 years. In a small step toward that goal, space agency director Charles Bolden has just announced plans for the X-57, the first all-electric addition to the famous X-plane series.