traffic

This Street Has No Lanes, Signals Or Signs -- And It's Safer For It

Imagine a street where pedestrians, bikes and cars peacefully coexist without any posted regulations or official roadway technology. Is this some autonomous car utopia of the near-future? Nope. This is a globally proven design for safer streets, which is finally making its way to the US.


Zurich Installed 4500 Street Sensors To Count Every Car In The City

Congestion pricing — the implementation of high tolls to keep cars out of congested downtown areas — is one of the most effective ways to reduce traffic and emissions. Zurich’s plan goes above and beyond that, using a network of sensors to track the number of cars that enter its downtown and prevent more cars from entering until congestion has subsided.


Forget Driverless Cars, This Tiny Design Tweak Can Make Streets Safer

We write about a lot of high-tech solutions for making roads safer: driverless cars, separated bike lanes, public transport, smarter signalling. Each of these are expensive to develop and difficult to adopt. What if there was a simple, cost-efficient way to guarantee safer streets? There could be: Make all traffic lanes just three metres wide.


Hacking Into Traffic Lights With A Plain Old Laptop Is Scary Simple

The idea that our traffic data systems are vulnerable is not a new one. In fact, improving cyber security on our nation’s infrastructure is a huge priority right now. But a new study from the University of Michigan on the vulnerabilities of traffic lights is shocking proof that we need to make some major changes, and we need to make them now.


Every City Should Give Seniors A Card That Extends The Crosswalk Time

We’ve all seen what happens when someone can’t cross the street in the allotted signal time — the pedestrian gets frustrated and drivers get mad. A program in Singapore lets seniors swipe a card at an intersection so the signal will give them extra time to cross. It’s a smart solution to a problem that’s increasingly going to be troubling our ageing cities.


Why Bikes Make Smart People Say Dumb Things

Scott Simon’s bio on the NPR website describes him as “one of America’s most admired writers and broadcasters,” and it’s tough to argue with that. As a Peabody-winning journalist with decades of experience, Simon’s credentials are unimpeachable, and as the Saturday host of Weekend Edition, he regularly shows himself to be all the things you want a radio host to be: thoughtful, avuncular, well-informed, and above all, smart.


Why Countdown Clocks For Pedestrians Actually Cause More Car Crashes

As a frequent traveller by foot, I love countdowns at crosswalks. They tell me whether I should wait out two seconds or leisurely walk across in 15. Ideed, these countdowns do make pedestrians safer. But it turns out that countdowns actually cause more crashes between cars. Here’s why.


Self-Driving Cars Will Hit California's Roads In September

On 16 September 2014, the US state of California will take one step closer to the utopian (or dystopian) future, allowing self-driving cars on public roads. And new autonomous vehicle regulations should help prevent the murder-bot anarchy that opponents are worried about.


How Far You Can Get By Car, Bike Or Foot, Any Time Of Day

Not all transportation is made equal: cars may zip by, but they get snarled up in traffic; walking is slow, but you’ll never get caught in a jam. Isoscope mashes together information sets to tell you how far you can get within your city via car, bike or foot — at any time of day.


It's Amazingly Easy To Hack Traffic Data And Cause Gridlock Chaos

Turns out you don’t need a shady lane closure on a major bridge to jam traffic. The sensor and signalling infrastructure on our streets is so vulnerable that all you need to wreak widespread havoc is a laptop.


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