Science & Health
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How To Deal With Your Inbox, According To Science

There are plenty of methods for coping with email overload, and you probably have one or two tricks of your own to try and reach inbox zero. But what about tips backed up by proper scientific research? These nuggets of advice are all based on recent studies of our email habits.


How Chess Has Changed Over The Last 150 Years

The rules of chess have remained consistent since the early 19th Century, but that doesn’t mean our approach to the game has stayed the same. Here are some intriguing and surprising ways the Game of Kings has changed its shape over the past 150 years.


Everyone Should Be Able To Explain Quantum Computing Like Justin Trudeau

When Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau schooled a journalist on the basics of quantum computing yesterday, I was initially as charmed and delighted as everyone else. But then a niggling sense of dismay set in. Why should this be such a singular newsworthy event? How come so few of us can do what Trudeau did, when science plays such a central role in almost every aspect of our daily lives?


Gamers Are Solving Quantum Physics Problems Faster Than Scientists

Every week people all around the world spend 3 billion hours playing games. Games are entering almost all areas of our daily life and have the potential to become an invaluable resource for science.

Citizen science games have already proved successful in advancing scientific endeavours such as protein folding and neuron mapping. However, this approach had not previously been applied to quantum physics, and a recent study has now shown that gamers are solving a class of problems in quantum physics that cannot be easily solved by algorithms alone.


Play With The Inner Workings Of A Neural Network On This Neat Website

Neural networks are a fundamental part of Artificial Intelligence: Software systems that train themselves to make sense of the human world. But if you want to understand how they work at a basic level, a cool new website allows you to get under the hood.


8 Ways To Use Your Phone As A Scientific Instrument

Your smartphone already wears a number of hats: camera, MP3 player, and it can even make and receive calls — but with the right set of apps, you can do much more with your handset. Here are 8 scientific instruments your phone is capable of transforming into.


There's A Robot Inside The Sydney Harbour Bridge

I’m sure our inevitable robot overlords will dish out sufficient payback 50 years from now, but today, it’s better to send in machines than humans when the work required is sufficiently dangerous. When it comes to maintaining the Sydney Harbour Bridge, NSW’s Roads and Maritime Services agrees and as such, have enlisted mechanical aid for the job, courtesy of the University of Technology Sydney.


Undiscovered Crevice Of Loch Ness Big Enough To Hide Monster

A sonar reading recently revealed a previously unseen trench at the bottom of Loch Ness. Located about 14.5km east of Inverness, it looks just large enough for Nessie to hide in. Or more plausibly, it’s yet another attempt by the locals to keep the myth alive — and the tourists flocking to the lake.


25 Horrible Things That Happen If You Don't Get Enough Sleep

In our 24/7 culture, sleep loss is a major problem. Back in 1942, we averaged almost 8 hours of sleep a night — now that’s down to 6.8. (Seven to 9 hours per night are what’s generally recommended.) Almost 40 per cent of Americans get less than seven hours of sleep a night, a recent Gallup poll found, and an estimated 70 million Americans have a sleep disorder. Everyone knows that it’s important to get enough sleep — but you may not realise just how many things can go wrong when you don’t.


Gizmodo Australia Podcast Episode 6: Best Games, Gadgets And Movies Of 2015

Episode 6: best and worst! The games, gadgets, movies and science stories that most caught our attention in 2015. We also chat with renowned theoretical physicist and string theorist, professor Brian Greene.

Watch the expanded show in video or subscribe to the audio feed via iTunes and Pocket Casts.


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