rover

Here Is What Earth Looks Like From Mars

Yeah, I can totally see it! How can you miss that? It’s right there. Clear eyes, full Earth, can’t miss. Wait, really? No of course not. Anyone who tells you that is either a liar or a hawk. Earth looks incredibly tiny up in that Martian sky. Sure, if you squint hard enough and fake it long enough, you’ll spot it the dot but it’s not unlike looking for dust on a wall.


Watch Mars Curiosity's Clever Wheels And Suspension System In Action

In case there was any doubt, the engineers at JPL did an amazing job: Just look at how the the Mars Curiosity Rover deals with the red planet’s bumpy terrain in this time-lapse GIF, taken from the Left Navcam pointed down at the wheels in motion.


Stabilised Video Of Lunar Buggy Ride Is Even Cooler Than The Original

There are few things more amazing than watching humans driving a lunar rover. I mean — these guys came in a spaceship from another planet to drive a goddamn buggy on the bloody Moon. The only way to better that video is to stabilise it.


The Chinese Rover's First Moon Photos Are Here

China’s National Space Administration has released photos taken by the Yutu rover on the moon. There is also video footage of the Chang’e 3 lander’s descent, and you can see in the video (below) when it comes to a full stop about 50 meters above the surface of the moon for a quick photo survey.


7 Ways NASA Making The Mars Rover Sing Itself "Happy Birthday" Is Sad

As you may know, yesterday was Curiosity’s one-year anniversary on Mars, where it’s been spending its time wandering the desolate, barren Martian desert in inconceivable levels of solitude. And how did NASA decide to commemorate the occasion? Happy birthday, idiot. Now dance, monkey — dance! Here’s why it’s sad.


Curiosity's Greatest Hits In Its One Year On Mars

Can you believe it’s been a full year since the Mars Curiosity rover made its absolutely spectacular red, dusty landing? Millions watched with bated breath the day that NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory began its historical journey. It may have taken everyone’s favourite interplanetary robot a little while to get up and running, but once it did, the discoveries kept on coming. Here’s a look back at some the more fun, mind-blowing, and all around spectacular of Curiosity’s finds in honour of its first martian anniversary.


10 Years Ago, Opportunity Rover Began A 90-Day Mission That Never Ended

When NASA’s Opportunity rover launched on July 7th, 2003, expectations were modest. It would spend 90 Martian days exploring soil and rock samples and taking panoramas of the Red Planet; anything else would be a bonus. Nearly 10 years after its initial shift was up, Opportunity is still going strong.


NASA's Curiosity Mars Rover Stars In New Qantas Frequent Flyer Ad

The Curiosity Rover is pretty busy up there on Mars, so how did it get time to star in this adorable new Qantas frequent flyer ad? Who cares, just watch it because cute robots.


Mars Rover: There Was Drinkable Water On Mars

Opportunity, aka The Little Rover That Could, is still making important discoveries 10 years into its Martian jaunt. After the devastating loss of twin rover Spirit in 2011, Opportunity rallied and kept trekking, only to recently discover a fascinating rock near Endurance Crater.


Explore The Dark Side Of Your Desk With This Wooden Curiosity Model

If you want a Curiosity rover of your own but don’t quite have NASA’s budget, you can save yourself $US2,499,999,850 by going with designer Arnold Patrick Martin’s beautiful wooden model. It doesn’t move, the cameras don’t work, and it probably won’t survive a trip to Mars, but it’s also only $US150.