Tagged With nbn

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The NBN's Goldilocks technology of fibre to the distribution point (FttDP) — sitting just right in between the convenience of fibre to the node (FttN) and the speed of fibre to the premises (FttP) — is a step closer to becoming a reality in Australia. NBN calls the tech 'fibre to the curb' (FttC) for some unknown reason, rather than FttDP or fibre to the driveway, but it's earmarked Australia's own Netcomm Wireless as the supplier of tech for the future network build-out.

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Customer complaints about NBN connections are up by 63 per cent, and complaints about NBN line faults are up nearly 150 per cent, according to the Telecommunications Industry Ombudsman's 2015-16 annual report released today. The NBN now accounts for almost 12 per cent of TIO complaints, but there's also a good side to the news: we're not complaining as much about our mobile and landline telephones any more.

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Last week, upstart Singaporean ISP MyRepublic launched an unlimited data, single speed tier plan on Australia's NBN. It has a 'gamer' variant of that plan, too, that it says is actually different — not just branding, not just smoke and mirrors. It's talking about optimised latency for gaming, and optimised routes to popular servers.

We spoke to the man that promises to make it happen in Australia, and he has some choice words about how to fix the NBN, what Telstra and Optus are doing wrong, and how building a network for gamers is easy — if you know what you're doing.

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With well over a million properties actively connected to the NBN, Australia's national broadband network is apparently starting to accelerate the speed of its rollout: the government-owned company calls it "continuing momentum". What's interesting, though, is how many customers are opting for higher speed tiers, suggesting that people actually do want faster internet — echoing the recent comments of upstart ISP MyRepublic, which says flawed copper-based technologies like fibre to the node are nowhere near future-proof.

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MyRepublic, touting itself as the ISP "for gamers", hits Australia on 15 November with a 100Mbps unlimted NBN plan for $59.99 per month. Here's everything we know so far.

As my new favourite commenter Tom Haynes says "I'll probably even be able to afford that on my old age pension by the time the NBN reaches me here 15 km from the centre of the 6th largest city in Australia."

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Foxtel has just launched itself head-first into the 21st century. The long-time cable subscription telly business has started offering its triple-play broadband, TV and home phone bundle packages to customers covered by the fibre to the premises portion of the country's national broadband network, and will let any customers on its ADSL plans transition to the NBN without having to re-jig their contracts. But it's pricy.

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FttNI might be a reality, if Pauline Hanson has her way.

As you may have heard, Hanson is the latest Joint Standing Committee member for the National Broadband Network. Now she has written to Communications Minister Mitch Fifield asking him to back a proposed 90km fibre optic spur to Norfolk Island from the $US300m Hawaiki Cable that will link the United States, Hawaii, Australia and New Zealand.

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The latest results from NBN lab trials of XG.FAST are in. Yes, that is the name of copper acceleration technology — an extension of Nokia's commercially available G.fast technology — not an antiperspirant spray designed to boost your masculinity. Basically, it's powering up the existing copper network to deliver fiber-like speeds, and has achieved lab results of 8Gbps over 30 metres of twisted-pair copper — 900 times faster than the average broadband speed.

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We are Australians. We play games online. We get our arses kicked because Australian internet is terrible. It's a disgrace. It's a damn disgrace.

But relax guys. Relax. Pauline Hanson is on the case. She knows. Pauline understands. Pauline Hanson is here to shake things up. Australian gamers, if Pauline Hanson has her way you will lose no more!

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The ACCC's tenure in regulating Australia's ADSL connections runs out in February of next year. A while ago, that would have been a reasonable enough time frame for the NBN to be finished around Australia. But with all the political fuckery that the network has been dragged through in the past few years, Australia's competition watchdog needs to extend its time taking care of ADSL and regulating the prices that you, the customer, are charged.

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The rollout of Australia's NBN will abandon almost all of Optus's HFC cable network that it paid $800 million for back in 2011, with up to 700,000 homes around the country instead being connected to the NBN through fibre to the distribution point — a new technology that brings many of the advantages of fibre to the premises to a fibre to the node-style construction method.

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Many Australians are now anticipating fast internet access at home when the NBN arrives in their neighbourhood. But what about mobile networks?

The next generation of mobile broadband is reportedly heading into incredible speeds, far faster than anything come down wires, with Telstra announcing today that it has tested "one of the world’s first" 5G radio test beds in Melbourne, in conjunction with Ericsson.

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As the NBN develops every year, the technology underpinning it improves. That's the main hope we have for Australia's copper infrastructure, which is being used for fibre to the node — and, potentially, fibre to the distribution point. The NBN is trialing a variety of technologies that promise to massively improve the speed of existing copper already in the ground, including by using the already-installed HFC cable networks previously operated by Telstra and Optus.

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Here's your chance to share your feedback. The ACCC is holding a Communications Sector Market Study, today opening the door to both industry and consumers on a range of issues from the NBN to data demand and mobile coverage.

It is time for a serious look at how we are preparing for the country's communications needs in an emerging digitally-enabled global economy, lobby group Internet Australia said, applauding the move.