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MPAA's Movie Search Engine Flagged As A Pirate Site

As a counter to how easy it is to search for pirated content on Google, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) launched its own search engine to drive up the rankings of sites that provide access to movies legally. Film distributors on the lookout for pirated content seem to not have been fully across what the MPAA were trying to achieve — and ended up reporting a number of listings to be removed from Google searches. Which they were.


Hollywood Relaxes Anti-Piracy Rules From Draconian To Just Really Strict

The Motion Picture Association of America, representing six major Hollywood studios, publishes anti-piracy guidelines for cinemas that show its movies. This year, for a fun change of pace, they’re actually becoming more lenient.


Video: The History Of The PG-13 Rating And Why The MPAA Sucks

The Dissolve put together this neat animation that briefly looks at the history of the PG-13 rating, a rating that was invented after Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom and Gremlins was released. And in discussion of the rating, it reveals how backwards the MPAA can be when it comes to violence vs sex, love and nudity.


PayPal Cancelled Mega's Account Because Of Encryption (But Really Piracy)

Mega is one of the only cloud storage services that offers end-to-end encryption, a great feature for people who value security. However, after political pressure from MPAA-affiliated goons, PayPal recently decided to stop providing payment services to Mega. What gives?


Report: Hollywood Totally Lied About Its Big Victory Over The Pirates

Back in 2013, the Motion Picture Association of America filed one of its biggest victories: a $US80 million settlement against Hotfile, a file-sharing website that got on the wrong side of Hollywood. Only, Hotfile never paid anything close to that amount, and the MPAA has been telling a (court-approved) fib about the whole thing.


Attorney General Jim Hood Calls Time Out On Google Vs MPAA Battle

An Attorney General caught up in the middle of the MPAA’s plans to attack Google is now backpeddling, after Google sued him for conspiring with the movie industry. Although, the recent exposure of communications between Jim Hood and the MPAA for everyone to see may also have something to do with it.


Sony Leak: The Secret Meetings That Set Hollywood's Anti-Piracy War Plan

Every year, legal representatives from seven of the biggest movie studios in the country gather in Sherman Oaks, California, to talk about all things anti-piracy. This isn’t surprising; it’s their livelihood, after all. But what does leaves a sour taste in your mouth is their plan to spread the DMCA-dispensing gospel with shadowy back room dealings and skewed facts.


This Is Hollywood's Global Anti-Piracy Strategy

The Sony leaks have proved to be fertile ground for celebrity gossip and identity theft, but they’re also proving to contain other, more serious details. Like the details of the Motion Picture Association of America’s strategy for combating piracy. This is it.


Sony Emails Reveal MPAA's Piracy Battle Plan, Google In Its Crosshairs

Since January of this year, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) has been preparing for long-term battle with an enemy referred to as “Goliath”, according to documents made available by the recent Sony hack. And after several of the documents have been examined, it’s looking very likely the pseudonym represents Google.


Would You Resell Your Ebooks And MP3s Even If You Could?

The MPAA doesn’t want anyone in the world to resell the movies you buy on iTunes and other services. Now over in the US, the American House of Representatives is now discussing if this is wrong or right. But does it matter? Would you resell your digital goods online if you could?


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