Tagged With morse code

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Honestly reviewing morse code is a little unnecessary. We're kind of done with that whole telegraph as the primary form of communication phase. On the other hand, it never hurts to know numbers in different systems. Roman numerals come in handy every now and then, right? Sometimes?

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This could work for any hollow figurine you have collecting dust on your shelves, but due to Android's open-source nature, a little robot is the obvious choice for DIY hackery. The full tutorial is on Instructables, but to make him react to sound; turn his head and flash his LED eyes in morse code patterns, you won't need many components.

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Dit-dat-dat. Dit-dit-dit-dit. Dit-dat. Dat. May 24, 1844. Samuel Finley Breese Morse is sitting in the Supreme Court chamber in the United States Capitol in Washington, DC. Dit-dit-dit-dit. Dit-Dat. Dat. Dit-dit-dit-dit. He has a message. And here it is in full-length.

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With all of the communication technology we have at our disposal today, good old fashioned Morse code is all but forgotten. However, I can see it making a comeback in a big way if these "Sector Compass Torch" watches take off. A small flashlight is embedded into the side of the watch and can be used to deliver messages along with the complete chart of international Morse code that is printed on the face. Unfortunately, the watch is a Japan-only release (and it is expensive at $US620 to boot), so I'm afraid we will have to continue to transmit our •—•• — — — •—••'s via text messages for now.