Tagged With julian assange

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WikiLeaks founder and editor-in-chief Julian Assange will (virtually) join superstar physicist Dr Brian Greene on Think Inc's 2017 Australian tour.

Think Inc is designed to "reinvigorate the thrill of rational discourse" in daily conversation, where audiences are invited to discuss "smart answers to big questions" alongside the heavyweights, with past speakers including the likes of Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson, Dr Cornel West, and Dr Michio Kaku.

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Suppression by "powerful states and organisations" is, according to Julian Assange in his 2012 book Cypherpunks: Freedom and the Future of the Internet, "one of the hardships WikiLeaks was built to endure." That claim must reek of false bluster now that his whistleblowing organisation has since been compromised by the US government, according to the internet's greatest conspiracy theorists.

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From the perspective of newsworthiness, Wikileak's Podesta emails have been totally weird. Amidst revelations about an ex-Blink-182 member's belief in extraterrestrial life, and Chairman of the Clinton campaign John Podesta's own advice on cooking risotto, Trump supporters on a variety of imageboards have been sifting through the emails for anything compromising. Last night it seems they hit paydirt.

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Wikileaks withheld a batch of emails showing a $US2.2 ($3) billion transaction between the Syrian regime and a Russian government-owned bank, according to a Daily Dot report. If true, the report will likely have a lasting negative impact on Wikileaks' credibility. The report alleges that the transparency organisation betrayed its own core values of "pristine leaking" and did so in a way that protects Russia's public image.

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Wikileaks founder Julian Assange promised to leak "thousands" of documents from the Clinton campaign on Wednesday during an interview with Fox News's Megyn Kelly. He also said the documents would be "significant" in the context of the US presidential election. Assange vowed to publish the data before the November election because he believes "people have the right to understand who they're electing".

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WikiLeaks has hit rock bottom. Once dedicated to careful vetting and redaction — sometimes too much redaction — the "whistleblower site" is now gleefully basking in its dump of thousands of emails hacked from the Democratic National Committee — most of which are full of personal, non-newsworthy information — published with the express intent of harming Hillary Clinton's political campaign. In this latest release, there is no brave whistleblower in sight, just an anonymous hacker believed by the FBI and US intelligence community to be a front for Russian intelligence services. The WikiLeaks project has fallen far from the lofty heights of its founding a decade ago, when Julian Assange promised to "facilitate safety in the ethical leaking movement".