Tagged With earth

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Video: Humanity gets served up a nice slice of humble pie in this NPR video that lays out the history of our planet on a football field. Even in a giant stadium, every inch represents an incredible 1.3 million years - that's around 511,000 years for every centimetre. Which means that humans, who walk around like they own the place, only show up about a third of a centimetre from the end zone.

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Video: This planet of ours, it ain't gonna last forever. And though who the heck knows what's going to happen to the world that far off into the future (or even after November 8), Life Noggin decided to conduct a little brain exercise about how we could convert a planet like Mars or Venus, or a moon like Europa, into a second Earth.

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The moon is our almost constant frenemy in space, lighting our nights and spoiling our star-views in equal turns. But now, new measurements from Apollo-era moon rocks suggest that the moon and Earth had a much more savage past than we knew.

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Australian and UK scientists have dug up the oldest fossils found on Earth to date — 3.7 billion-year-old sedimentary formations created by clumps of bacteria — which predate the current earliest fossils by a whopping 220 million years, and suggest life originated here more than four billion years ago.

And the researchers say they could help us learn about life on Mars.

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Video: Obviously, in order to answer this super-silly thought exercise, you'd have to make it a little bit more manageable to calculate. That means in this scenario, the Earth is perfectly round, has the same density all throughout, and won't, like, scorch your bum when you fall through the core. Life Noggin explains the maths behind how long it would take, giving consideration to all that gravity nonsense, and comes up with a shockingly small number.

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Video: North America is a beautiful continent that's home to the Rockies, Yosemite, the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone and many more natural wonders. How did that happen? How did North America get its shape? The answer is that it took millions and millions of years. Over the history of Earth, tectonic plates have smashed into each other and dove under one another to literally move continents and create everything we see above ground.

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Video: It's an age old question that we love to entertain because we're all obsessed with our own mortality and the future of the world: what would happen to the world if humans disappeared? With enough time, the Earth would be able to reset itself and erase any trace of our existence. Mind Warehouse goes deep into answering it by detailing the progression of what would happen when.

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Video: Our solar system is weird. Not only because we're unique little snowflakes on a blue marble called Earth, but because other stars usually have their giant arse planets (that is, their Jupiter) orbiting them at a much closer distance. This is really common in other systems! Our Jupiter, however, doesn't work like that. Why?

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Video: There's over seven billion people on this planet of ours and some estimates peg the population to reach 10 billion by the end of the century. Given that there's only a certain amount of land on Earth, is there a maximum amount of humans that our blue marble can support? Sort of! And that limit is tied to our diet and the land we need to dedicate to livestock (the size of Africa!) and crops (the size of South America!).

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Video: Queue up that 2001 soundtrack, baby! Following up on the incredible Aurora Borealis and Australis footage that NASA posted a few days ago, we can now marvel at crystal clear 4K footage of our home sweet home, covered in white clouds and blue sky. Now that NASA and the astronauts on the ISS are shooting and sharing videos in glorious 4K, you finally have a perfectly justifiable reason to upgrade your TV.