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How To Make A DIY Dyson Bladeless Fan With A Water Jug And A Plant Vase

Video: Dyson’s Bladeless Fans are wonderfully awesome but also ridiculously expensive. Am I really going to spend 450 bucks on a fan? Nah. Thankfully Rulof the master maker of things breaks down how to build the bladeless fan with a water jug, a few vases and a microwave fan.


Dyson Supersonic: Australian Price And Release Date

Pre-orders for Dyson’s super fancy hair dryer are now open in Australia. From today you can put your cash down on the $699 Supersonic, which will hit retailers 9 July.

We got hands on with the Supersonic at its launch in Japan this April, checking out its intelligent heat control to help protect hair from extreme heat damage, fast yet focused airflow, engineering designed for balance and fabled lack of excessive noise.


Jake Dyson Is Fixing The Way We Light Up Our Homes And Offices

We’ve been thinking about lighting the wrong way for years, apparently. Desk lamps with shades over globes, downlights in household ceilings, fluorescent light fixtures in offices. Jake Dyson, son of renowned inventor Sir James Dyson, and an entrepreneur and inventor in his own right, has turned his attention to making a better light — and fixing the way that designers use light in home and office spaces alike.

“It’s not about seeing the light,” he tells Gizmodo. “It’s about seeing the result of the light.”


Hands On With Dyson's New V8 Cordless Vacuum

We called Dyson’s cordless DC59 Motorhead the first genuine replacement for a full-sized vacuum, even with a few annoying design quirks and limited battery life. It has taken the company almost two years to design a follow-up, but the new Dyson V8 appears to fix most of the complaints we had with the original.


Giz Gadgets: The Futuristic Sci Fi Tech That's Available Now(ish)

Each new week brings with it an abundance of new gadgets — whether devised by tech giants like Google and Samsung or pushed by hopeful entrepreneurs to Kickstarter, they run the gamut from useful to niche to tech that nobody really needs. This week we’re looking at gadgets that wouldn’t be out of place in a high-tech sci-fi — though some of them should have stayed a fiction.


Lunch Time Deals: $50 Off A Dyson V6 Animal Handstick Vacuum

We love Dyson, and we love discounts. When you’re buying your lunch today, you might want to take a moment and spend a little more. Gizmodo’s Lunch Time Deals posts point out any particularly good bargains for Aussie bargain hunters around the ‘net. This week, JB Hi-Fi’s Instant Deal gives you $50 off a Dyson V6 Animal handstick.


Sir James Dyson: How To Be A Successful Inventor

The path of an inventor is not an easy one. From his first invention in the 70’s (it was the Ballbarrow — a wheelbarrow with a ball) to his latest “baby”, the Supersonic hairdryer, Sir James Dyson has forged his own way.

If you want to follow in his footsteps, be warned — its not for everyone. We sat down for a chat with the man who sees failure, obstacles and complaints as positives.


Australian Exclusive: Dyson Supersonic Hands-On

They say it’s powerful, light, safe and quiet. Supersonic is Dyson’s brand new foray into the world of hair care, and while it is at its core a hairdryer, what it represents is so much more.

It is taking a product that has been around forever, looking at its flaws with a critical eye, and setting out to fix them — with science. But does it live up to the promises? I took a closer look to find out.


Meet The Dyson Supersonic, The World's Smartest Hairdryer

Dyson — the British company famous for its vacuum cleaners and Air Multiplier fans — has invested almost $95 million, enlisted 103 engineers, built 600 prototypes, and has over 100 patents pending, all into the creation of a hairdryer.

It’s one of those things that doesn’t seem to make sense — and then, suddenly, it does. And it’s not just because vacuum cleaners were once the only option for drying hair.


Dyson's Vacuums Are Complicated, But Also Kinda Simple

Dyson makes good vacuum cleaners. Dyson makes complicated vacuum cleaners, but all that complex engineering work doesn’t really matter to the customer that buys one. At the end of the day, it’s just a vacuum cleaner, and it just has to do the vacuuming. Being complex also means being simple, really.

To demonstrate this, Dyson and Gizmodo teamed up to take a new Dyson Cinetic Big Ball apart, and then put it back together. To be specific, Dyson did the taking apart bit, and I tried the putting back together bit.


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