Tagged With diabetes

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An analysis by Tufts University researchers has failed to find a link between butter consumption and cardiovascular disease. And hallelujah to that — the ongoing hysteria against butter can now finally come to an end.

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For years, assistance dogs have been used to detect low blood sugar levels in their diabetic owners and warn of an impending hypoglycemia attack. Scientists have finally figured out how dogs are able to accomplish this feat — an insight that could lead to new medical sensors.

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Australian scientists have shown that brown fat — a special type of fat that burns energy to produce heat — may also help to keep blood sugar steady in adults. Researchers at Sydney’s Garvan Institute of Medical Research measured brown fat activity and blood glucose continuously in real time in study participants, and found that individuals with more brown fat had smaller fluctuations in blood sugar.

Their findings open new avenues for diabetes therapies that target brown fat.

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Stanford researchers recently published work on a small microchip they have developed that scans for diabetes in a fraction of the time of current tests. Additionally, their test is reusable for upwards of 15 patients, can be performed on site, and is more accurate in differentiating the biomarkers that distinguish type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In other words, it's a major milestone in diabetes research.

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Whether you don't like needles, or whether you really don't like needles, there's some good news on the horizon: a special "bioadhesive" coating that was just developed at Brown University is bringing us one step closer to saying goodbye to injections and hello to things like insulin pills.

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Hundreds of thousands of people around the world are diagnosed with type 1 diabetes each year. The disease is marked by a complete shutdown of the body's insulin production. It requires regular blood testing and insulin injections throughout the day. Now, a new artificial pancreas could soon change the entire process of regulating a patient's glucose by making it completely automatic.