Tagged With data visualisation

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If you have data, you can find a weird and wonderful way to visualise it. Take real-time changes to Wikipedia, something that would normally be presented in a rather dry, analytical form, has been transformed into a live musical performance composed of additions, subtractions and new user registrations.

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This is the work of a Grand Maester. Joeltronics made this very useful graph that shows which episode of Game of Thrones the TV show corresponds to which chapter and which book in the A Song of Ice and Fire books (aka the Game of Thrones books). That way you know what's been shown when and what's been omitted in the story. Warning, potential spoilers!

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This chart showing the height of the tallest skyscrapers built over time, made by The Economist, can get a little hectic with what seems like axises and data points that go beyond x, y and z and on to some unknown letter but it is deeply interesting. It shows what the tallest building built in which year was, how tall it was, which continent it was built on, highlights iconic buildings and lists what world event was going on during specific years.

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New York City is about as urban as urban gets, but even concrete jungles harbour leafy life. At last count, there were 592, 130 trees in the Big Apple and thanks to the efforts of Brooklyn-based designer Jill Hubley, you can now study them all in a colourful interactive map.

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If you live in a city, you've probably experienced stepping onto a crowded train platform and feeling like a fish in a school, with everyone trying to swim the same direction. That's a pretty accurate image, according to this new visualisation of commuters on the London Tube.

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The baize rubs against your wrist. A small bead of sweat rolls down your forehead. You ease the corner of your two cards from the table to glimpse at what you've been dealt. "How much chance do I have of winning with this," you think. Well, if you had this neat visualisation, you'd be all set.