at&t

How Much Does A Wiretap Go For These Days?

For years, the US government and phone carriers have been squabbling over secret surveillance — because of the dollar amount on the bill. Most recently, AT&T’s thrifty little offshoot Cricket Communications has agreed to pay out $US2.1 million in a settlement for overcharging federal and state law enforcement agencies for wiretaps and pen registers, and Sprint is also being sued by the US government for overcharging for wiretaps.


Even Steve Wozniak Has Problems With Customer Support From Hell

We all have been lost in the infinite recursive hell of customer support numbers, waiting forever, talking with people we can barely understand, trying to solve a problem. It’s not only us, mere mortals. Famous people like Steve Wozniak also suffer it. He sent us his 4-hour nightmare with AT&T.


What's The Generic Word For Skype? Videophone? Video Chat?

As technologies evolve, so does the language we use to describe them. Radio used to be called wireless telephone. Some people used to call the internet the catenet. But what do we call it when you’re talking with a person via video link? Is it videophone? Video chat? Skype?


Inside The Giant Data Centre Hidden In The Middle Of Manhattan

Between 1928 and 1932, two Art Deco skyscrapers were built in Lower Manhattan to house the telecommunications infrastructure for Western Union and AT&T. Almost 100 years later, the towers are still fulfilling their original intentions as data centres for Telx, an internet services company.


How Engineers Laid The First Submarine Transatlantic Cable Back In 1959

In this hyper-modern, satellite-powered wireless age, it’s easy to forget how not too long ago North America’s main connection to Europe was a single cable: the TAT-1. This, the first submarine transatlantic telephone cable was finally completed in 1956, just in time for operators to realise they needed a second. Guess what they named that one.


Guess Who's Winning The Money Battle In The War On Net Neutrality

Who’s spending the most to win the hearts and minds of US Congress in the war on net neutrality? Verizon and AT&T, of course. Followed by — guess who? — Comcast. In other words, the companies that stand to lose money if the internet remains free and open are trying to shut it down.


The Experimental Satellite That Gave Us Live International Television

Throughout the 1950s, broadcast television was limited to domestic transmissions simply because we didn’t have a means to relay signals far enough to span the vast expanse of the oceans around us. It wasn’t until NASA shot Telstar, an unproven, newfangled “active” communications satellite into orbit in 1963, that mass media truly become an international phenomenon.


Audi Shows Off The Brains Of Its Future Self-Driving Cars

Here in Las Vegas at CES, Audi has showcased continued work on its self-driving ‘piloted drive’ efforts — currently housed in a stylish A7 concept car. While brains of the ‘zFAS’ system need the power to continually monitor surroundings and plan or control trajectory, Audi’s engineers have shrunk the components down to the size of an iPad. The future is coming. Take a look…


AT&T Brings Global LTE Connectivity To The Car

AT&T is joining the connected car fray with AT&T Drive. Announced today at CES, it gives automakers a global data platform for things like voice-controlled apps and in-car entertainment, similar to plans by Google and Apple.


American Customer Service Horror Stories

While my own Verizon horror story did work out in the end (replacement phone received, $US500 penalty avoided, woohoo), not many people have a globe-spanning soapbox like Gizmodo upon which to kvetch. Here are 10 of the most stupendously terrible cases of customer service Giz US readers have had to endure. Let us know your Aussie tales in the comments.