Tagged With allergies

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When a 5m tall wooden sculpture was installed in the FBI's Miami field office in 2015, the US government thought it was getting a great deal. The General Services Administration (GSA) commissioned the work and estimated that it was "likely worth more than the $750,000 the government paid." But it's currently sitting in storage in Maryland. Why? The sculpture got over a dozen FBI agents seriously sick.

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Hospitals across Melbourne were put on emergency alert on Monday night as thousands of people called ambulance services, reporting breathing difficulties and other severe symptoms. Emergency rooms were so strained that day units were opened to handle the overflow. It was a severe outbreak of the phenomenon called "thunderstorm asthma" — but how does an emergency like this actually happen?

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For years, scientists have known that growing up on a farm protects children from asthma, but the reasons for this weren't entirely clear. A fascinating comparative analysis of Amish and Hutterite farming communities has finally uncovered the specific aspects of farm life that are responsible for this built-in immune protection.

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Canon just released a statement saying the front rubber grips of some Canon EOS 650D DSLR cameras may cause an allergic reaction. The grips could also turn white after a short period of time, which combined with the possibility of allergies, is, uh, sort of a problem since you hold the thing to take pictures.

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Some people are incapacitated all year from sneezes, coughs and itchy eyes. While allergies are a pain in the arse, they may not be the misguided immune responses many scientists have believed them to be. In fact, a new theory suggests that they may have evolved to protect us.

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The next time you're looking to get a dog, get any kind you want. Yep, any breed, size, fur, even if you have pet allergies. Wait, what? According to researchers, there's no difference between a hypoallergenic dog and non-hypoallergenic dog.

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This week's toolkit is a personal one: allergies. I've had 'em as long as I can remember and this year, they are TERRIBLE. I can barely function myself, sometimes, and figured these seven tools might help alleviate the suffering of others.

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You want to know what snake oil smells like? Take a whiff of the Lifemax Sneezer beam. Oh wait—you can't because your nose is stuffed up. Well, I suggest taking some Allegra because I hardly think cramming two light beam rods up your nose that use "dual-wavelength phototherapy" will do much to relieve congestion, runny nose, watery eyes and headaches. Even if you are desperate and willing to try anything, the manufacturer claims that it takes three applications at three minutes a pop over the course of a month to generate improvement. Sounds like a waste of $US60 if you ask me.

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A British Association of Dermatologists' study showed that the levels of nickel found in mobile phones can cause dermatological problems for many mobile phone users. As many as 33% of people are at least slightly allergic to nickel, and nearly half of the 22 phones tested had levels that could affect those poor souls. Luckily, the allergy causes friendly, non-fatal dermatitis: itchy skin and a mild rash, easily healed with a topical steroid cream. I feel like mobile phones get a bad rap, since even jewellery can cause the same reaction, so here's an encouraging list of diseases you definitely won't get from your phone.

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Are your allergies so severe that a Claritin has no effect? The Japanese have a solution, and it involves shoving round pieces of plastic up your nose to block out allergens. It may seem unorthodox, but as the lady at the clinic keeps telling me, prevention is much more effective than cures. We'll stick to pills, thanks.

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I have allergies. It's not horrible, but a couple times a month I'll have to take something for it. Therefore, you'd think this completely allergy free Ford Mondeo would be fantastic for me. Sadly for Ford, my allergies aren't bad enough to make me drive a Mondeo.

For those of you who do suffer horribly, this car has no nickel and chrome in the cockpit, is constructed from low-emission adhesives, and only uses allergen-tested textiles and leathers. It also has a pollen filter to filter out sneeze-inducers from the air coming in. Still, Mondeo. – Jason Chen

Ford Mondeo deemed allergy free