Tagged With 3d printing

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We've all been there: Building a scale model of the Death Star in our basement and thinking, "I just wish this had a tractor beam to grab onto my tiny Styrofoam Millennium Falcon." Now, thanks to a team of scientists, you can put the finishing touches on that model with your very own sonic tractor beam. OK, maybe we haven't all been there, but I'm sure someone has been there.

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There's no need to elaborate on the benefits of 3D printing in medicine. While transplants will remain the most practical option for replacing whole organs, lab-constructed replicas for simpler body parts are making significant inroads every year. Australia, or more accurately, Queensland, will take a massive step towards being a world leader in this burgeoning field come 2017, when the Herston Biofabrication Institute opens its doors in Brisbane.

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Conceptually, a camera lens isn't a complicated piece of kit. Still, the quality of images photographer Mathieu Stern managed to take with his 3D-printed lens, featuring a single front element and mounted on his Sony Alpha 7ii, is still surprising. Only the blur and distortion in the corners gives the game away.

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A team of researchers rode a roller coaster more times than they probably care to remember, just to figure out why roller coasters trigger the passage of small kidney stones. With the further help of a 3D-printed model of a kidney filled with urine, they think they have solved the puzzle.

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MakerBot was going to change the world. It was going to bring 3D-printing, long a product limited to designer offices and workshops, into the home (or at least the garage). But earlier today, under a veil of marketing speak and glitzy videos, the company announced a new focus on commercial — not consumer — products, and in so doing, finally admitted what we've all known for a while. No one really wants a 3D printer in their house.

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FutureHear is part of a partnership between QUT and Hear and Say, a charity providing hearing, listening and speaking solutions for children, to develop next-generation 3D printed prosthetic ears.

The prosthetic ears are the first step in a program that will eventually create real tissue and bionic ears as well, and the team is turning to crowdfunding to finance the project.