Why It Takes To Transport 112 Tonnes Of Arctic Ice Over 3,000 Kilometres

You’ve seen the pictures. The time lapses of glaciers shrinking into patchworks of white, the videos of ice crumbling into the ocean. But the Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson wants you to really see how quickly the ice is melting — and to do so, he and a Greenlandic geologist fished 112 tons of ice out of a Greenland fjord and shipped it to Copenhagen.


How Drones Are Being Used To Track Malaria

America’s got pretty good at using drones to hunt and kill big tangible things, but Hellfire missiles and Reapers aren’t all that good at tracking little insects. But that hasn’t stopped researchers from using (smaller, less deadly) drones to help fight the spread of infectious disease.


Scientists Discover 64P Comet Stinks And Has Dunes Just Like Earth

The spacecraft Rosetta keeps surprising everyone with amazing new photos taken in pursuit of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, taken just 7.4 kilometers from its surface. These images reveal dunes just like those you can find on Earth. Scientists have also found that it really stinks.


Space X Dragon Capsule Successfully Splashes Down In The Pacific Ocean

Space X’s Dragon capsule has successfully splashed down in the Pacific Ocean after a month-long turnaround on the International Space Station, having delivered a 3-D printer to outer space.


Can You Help CERN Identify What's Happening In These Archive Images?

As an institute full of scientists, you might think CERN was good at keeping records. But it’s happened upon a stash of archived images that seem to make no sense whatsoever — and it wants you to help it work out what they show.


ATLAS Is Getting Faster And Faster At Simple Human Tasks

Oh, sure, we all pointed and laughed at ATLAS when it was first revealed, stumbling over simple obstacles. But it was because deep down we all knew that, like our original iPods, it would quickly evolve into something far more capable. And, here we are, just over a year later, and ATLAS is already tackling simple obstacles with ease.


Humans' Inherent Curiosity Stems From A Long, Protracted Childhood

Curiosity is one of our most basic traits and we have a lot to thank for it. Without the primal urge to always want to see what lies over the next hill, or the other the ocean, or beyond the confines of our atmosphere, humans would still be living — quite literally — in the stone age. In Curious: The Desire to Know and Why Your Future Depends On It, author Ian Leslie (@mrianleslie) explains how and why our need to discover really is second nature. The following is an excerpt from the book.


All The Planets In The Solar System Fit Between The Earth And The Moon

Briefly: I never thought of this, but you can fit all the planets in the Solar System back to back into the distance from the Earth to the moon — about 384,400km — with room to spare: 8030km. Seeing it visualised really gives you a good idea of how much empty space is out there.


Hydroceramic Walls Could Cool Buildings By Sweating Like Human Skin

Our reliance on air conditioning, however magical an innovation, has become a serious environmental burden. Which is why researchers in Barcelona designed a material they say can naturally cool rooms by about 5C, using a moisture-absorbing polymer that “sweats” much like our own body.


Something Amazing Happens When You Chill Sugar Cubes In Liquid Nitrgoen

It’s not something most people would stumble across. But Mikhail Svarichevsky has found that sugarcubes glow bright green in UV light when they have been dunked in liquid nitrogen.


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