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Names, email addresses, telephone numbers, dates of birth, hashed passwords (using MD5) and, in some cases, encrypted or unencrypted security questions and answers were stolen from over one billion Yahoo accounts during two separate hacks in 2013 and 2014.

It has now been revealed that Australian politicians, senior Defence officials, police and judges - including Shadow Treasurer Chris Bowen, Liberal MP Andrew Hastie, Social Services Minister Christian Porter, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews, opposition health spokesperson Catherine King and Liberal senator Cory Bernardi - were among those whose accounts were compromised.

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South Korea is in political chaos after the recent impeachment of its president, Park Geun-hye, and now, the charges of corruption are spreading to the highest levels of Samsung. A prosecutor is seeking the arrest of the company's vice chairman and de facto leader, Jay Y. Lee.

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Last year represented a breaking point of sorts for major online platforms. The swelling tide of abuse, hate-speech, and politicized misinformation finally grew too big to be ignored. But the ensuing crackdown — as painfully slow and largely ineffective as is — has led to a concurrent rise in largely-unknown sites and services clamoring to be the Most Free for free speech absolutists.

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Gruntier video cards. More powerful CPUs. Higher resolution displays. All this stuff is really important when it comes to enjoying quality 3D experiences, be it video games or virtual reality. But none of it matters if it takes 400 years to download those experiences. Hence why companies such as Google spend a lot of time researching new ways to compress data. Now Google has a new compression library for 3D models — called "Draco" — and it looks very promising.

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The future of net neutrality in the US looks pretty bleak right now. Next week, FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler will step down after leading the commission for the last three years. During his time as chairman, Wheeler issued the 2015 Open Internet Order, a set of rules that protests net neutrality by prohibiting ISPs from blocking or throttling web traffic. All indications show the new US FCC will work to undo the current commissions work "as soon as possible".

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You can imagine that back in August 2011, when a user requested support for the lossless audio format FLAC in Chrome, it didn't shoot to the top of Google's list of critical features to implement. But that was five years ago. It's only with Chrome 56, the browser's next major revision, that FLAC will be playable natively.

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On Thursday, Donald Trump's transition team announced that Rudy Giuliani would be forming a cybersecurity team for the US President-elect, citing the former New York City mayor's 16 years of experience "providing security solutions in the private sector". In all those years, however, it appears that Giuliani never checked the defences of his own company's website, giulianisecurity.com, which is a bona fide security nightmare.

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Palmer Luckey, the founder of Oculus VR, is still nowhere to be seen. That may be all over soon. This week marked the start of a trial over the $US2 billion ($2.6 billion) lawsuit brought by video game company Zenimax against Oculus VR owner Facebook. The suit alleges Oculus stole core intellectual property when it poached current Chief Technical Officer, John Carmack, and there's a possibility Luckey may be called to testify.

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When I was 18 years old, I bought a baby Louis Vuitton handbag off of eBay. It was about $400 and light blue. I loved it. Then the zipper broke, and when I took it to the Louis Vuitton store to get repaired, the snooty sales girl informed me that it was counterfeit. Eighteen-year-old me was incensed, humiliated and embarrassed, but I learned an expensive (if important) lesson: Don't buy designer goods off of eBay.

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They look like goddamn aliens. But they're actually a shrimp. Kind of.

And someone just found them in the middle of the desert in Central Australia.

Yep. Shrimps. In the desert. Nature is weird.

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The South Korean special prosecutor's office is considering the arrest of Samsung's leader, Jay Y. Lee, as part of an investigation into $33.85 million worth of payments made by Samsung to a business and foundations backed by a friend of impeached President Park Geun-hye. The friend in question, Choi Soon-sil, has been charged with bribery.

The payments were allegedly made in return for the national pension fund's support for a merger of Samsung C&T Corp and Cheil Industries Inc back in 2015.

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Silicon Valley has always had close ties with the US government. But it appears the Trump administration would like to make those ties even more explicit: Yesterday, former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani announced that he's forming a new cybersecurity team for President-elect Trump, comprised of various private tech companies.

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If the highly-suspect 35-page document published yesterday by Buzzfeed is to be believed, US President-elect Trump has paid to be urinated on by Russian prostitutes. Dino Rachiele is not a prostitute, but he did give Trump a golden shower — and he's proud of it.