This Collection Of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

A well-designed public transit map is a wonderful thing: clean, clear, simple and intuitive. A bad one, however, will serve to confuse you until you no longer know in which direction you're headed. Designer Cameron Booth has put together Transit Maps, which rounds up awful public transit maps from around the world. Some make complex systems more complicated than they need to be, some appear to have been designed in PowerPoint by drunk city officials, and others just make no sense whatsoever.

Here are a few of our favourites from Booth's site, along with some choice cuts from his biting insights.


Bus System of Meiningen, Germany

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

Technically deficient, confusing to use and hideous to behold


Central London Night Bus Routes

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

I have absolutely no idea where any of the buses go.


Bus Network of Brownsville, Texas

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

The graduated blue background causes visual dissonance with just about everything else on the map.


Public Transport Network of Debrecen, Hungary

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

In short, it's an absolute disaster.


Josephine County Transit Bus Map, Oregon

This Collection of Bad Transit Maps Will Get You Very Lost Very Quickly

A blurry, muddy, incomprehensible mess without any useful labelling at all.


But let's not stop there! There are plenty more gems like this over on Booth's website. You should go check it out.

[Transit Maps via Laughing Squid]

Top image by Alex Abian


Comments

    Recently on a trip to Japan I discovered the hard way that there are two train networks in Toyko, the above ground and the subway netoworks. Needless to say on a whim I tried to navigate the subway using the above ground network map. After getting lost I cornered a ticket officer who spoke a some broken English asking him where I was on my map, he studied my map for a few moments and pointed to a blank section of the map and said you're there, then he pulled out another map and the penny dropped!

      There's actually 3 networks, the local tokyo trains, the non-local trains (go to the airports, other cities, etc.) and the subway/metro. And then some of these networks are further segmented into different companies, JR vs Keisei, which can make buying day tickets etc. confusing)

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