Computing

This Aussie Far Cry Primal Case Mod Is Just Insane

Case mods can be pretty cool even when they’re quite basic — you know, some nicely routed cables and a custom water-cooling reservoir. But when you go all out, you can make something amazing — and that’s exactly what this Aussie case mod, built to promote the new Far Cry game, is all about. On the outside it’s little more than a bit of spray paint and stenciling, but take off the side and it hardly resembles a PC at all.

Stephen Hoad of Oz Modz is one of Asus Australia’s five pro modders — this kind of thing is basically his day job. He’s also a big fan of previous Far Cry games, and with Primal about to come out, he put together this crazy build in a little over a fortnight. It’s a machine that has a massive amount of power under the hood, but that also showcases the gritty, dirty, go-hunt-some-animals idea of Far Cry Primal as well.

Built around an entirely appropriate and extremely rugged Asus TUF Sabertooth Z170 Mark I full-ATX motherboard, with a pair of STRIX GTX 970 graphics cards in SLI for enough visual grunt to (hopefully) run Far Cry Primal at high resolution and quality settings, Stephen’s case mod starts with a barebone ThermalTake Core X9, but the end result is extremely different — especially on the inside.

That case, for one, starts out with the motherboard laying flat — and, as you can see, it’s now vertical, with custom mounts and a whole lot of bondo holding everything together. The entire system is watercooled with EK waterblocks on GPUs and CPU, running through two massive radiators, but it’s not the computing hardware that’s impressive; it’s the amount of sculpting work, painting and refining that has all come together in its final form. Look at those SSDs — they’re blended into the rock.

The work that has gone into Oz Modz’ Primal case is incredible. It’s all detailed in a short video that Hoad has put together. You can find plenty of photos of the case, in exquisite detail, below that. The full build log is on the bit-tech.net forums, and has some photos of the deconstruction of the case and painting.


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