Tagged With wellness

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

You have, as of today, a one hundred per cent chance of dying. But a lot of people would like a little more time to do things, like eat interestingly-shaped pastas, or play catch with their grandchildren. That makes sense. I'd also like to do those things. But sometimes, our pursuit to eat lots of pasta or die trying leads some of us to make decisions that don't actually help -- like taking alternative, instead of conventional, cancer treatments.

Juicero began in secret. The startup, a sort of Keurig for cold-pressed plant-water -- which made headlines for the $US120 million ($161.8 million) in venture capital it secured from the likes of Google and Kleiner-Perkins between 2013 and 2015, and again when it announced its Wi-Fi-connected countertop appliance would cost a jaw-dropping $US700 ($943) on launch -- intended to keep its business free from prying eyes, either because it feared corporate espionage, mockery or both. Was it the future of convenient health food, or an overfunded subscription service for bags of chopped up plants?

Since launching in 2011, Silicon Valley healthcare startup Sano Intelligence has kept a low profile. Despite raising $US20 million ($26 million) in venture capital, the company founded by ex-Bain Capital analyst and bioengineering grad Ashwin Pushpala has yet to release its product -- a continuous glucose tracker that sticks to a users' skin and monitors blood through an app. Gizmodo has obtained new details about the device, and how the company intends to market it as a product for "metabolic insight" for non-diabetics, rather than to diabetics who regularly need to track their glucose. The strategy means Sano doesn't need FDA approval in the US, but doctors and diabetes experts interviewed by Gizmodo question whether the product would have any benefits to non-diabetics at all.

You most certainly know someone taking fish oil pills -- those fishy, translucent gold capsules -- for their purported heart benefits. But evidence continues to mount that fish oil might be snake oil. At the very least, it doesn't pack nearly the punch we once thought. Instead, it's probably just worth eating actual fish, which is loaded with plenty of healthy vitamins and minerals.