Tagged With universe

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Humans don't know much about the universe, but we do know that most of the gravity holding it together — around 85 per cent of it — comes from something we can't see or touch called dark matter. And some other force we can't see or touch, called dark energy, is simultaneously causing the universe to expand, at an ever-increasing rate. But our measurements that seek to nail down the effects of dark energy don't seem to be adding up.

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Across the Universe, as we speak (well, millions of years ago, but whatever) galaxies are being killed.

So this raises the question a team of global researchers are searching for the answer to - and they just might have it. What is killing off the universe's galaxies? Short answer: gas-stripping.

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Video: This planet of ours, it ain't gonna last forever. And though who the heck knows what's going to happen to the world that far off into the future (or even after November 8), Life Noggin decided to conduct a little brain exercise about how we could convert a planet like Mars or Venus, or a moon like Europa, into a second Earth.

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Three hundred and twenty light years away in the Centaurus constellation sits one of the strangest planets humans have ever laid eyes on. It's four times as massive as Jupiter and orbits twice as far out as Pluto — around one of its three suns.

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Video: People are generally wrong. So don't be afraid to stand out on your own with your own crazy theory on how this here world and the universe around us exists (let's not get too conspiracy crazy though). Here are five ideas that were totally crazy at the time but actually turned out to be right. Like how the Earth is round and how gravitational waves exist and how the Big Bang Theory is the leading theory on how the universe exists and so on.

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Image Cache: A map of the known universe to a constant scale would either be very big, or very useless. But use a logarithmic scale to compress the distances as you travel outwards, and you get this gorgeous and slightly Eye-of-Sauron image.

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Like a celestial Rorschach test, I can see so many things when I stare at this wonderful photo captured by the Hubble Space Telescope. It's like static on a TV. Or like a crowded future city lit by buildings stacked on buildings. But what it really is is even cooler: it's the first time pictures have been taken of white dwarf stars migrating from the centre of a star cluster to the outskirts.

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Video: Ray Bradbury is one of my favourite sci-fi writers. I read his books and watched the movies adapted from his books — Truffaut's Fahrenheit 451 is a must watch — but I've never heard him talk. This video illustrates the audio from a 1974 interview where he shares his thoughts about science and the universe.