Tagged With translational psychiatry

Cocaine, as they say, is a hell of a drug. It affects three of the neurotransmitters in our brains that make us feel fantastic -- dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine -- and tolerance for the stuff doesn't seem to dissipate even months after quitting. (It's also expensive and bad for you.) Today, new research published in Translational Psychiatry adds another bizarre facet to one of the world's most popular drugs: The cocaine addicts in your life have unusual deposits of iron in their brains.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Cocaine, as they say, is a hell of a drug. It affects three of the neurotransmitters in our brains that make us feel fantastic -- dopamine, serotonin and norepinephrine -- and tolerance for the stuff doesn't seem to dissipate even months after quitting. (It's also expensive and bad for you.) Today, new research published in Translational Psychiatry adds another bizarre facet to one of the world's most popular drugs: The cocaine addicts in your life have unusual deposits of iron in their brains.