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Janus Cybercrime Solutions, the author of Petya -- the ransomware initially attributed with Wednesday's global cyberattacks -- resurfaced on Twitter early Thursday, seemingly offering to help those whose files can no longer be recovered.

The altruistic gesture, even if it does prove fruitless, is uncharacteristic of the criminal syndicate that launched an underworld enterprise by placing powerful exploits in the hands of others to deploy as they saw fit. It may also simply indicate that Janus would prefer not to be tagged with the spread of "NotPetya" -- so named by Kaspersky Lab, which has itself sought to differentiate between Janus' ransomware and that which worked havoc across Europe this week.

There's consensus now among malware experts that NotPetya is actually a wiper -- malware designed to inflict permanent damage -- not ransomware like Petya, which gave its victims' the option of recovering their data for a price.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Janus Cybercrime Solutions, the author of Petya -- the ransomware initially attributed with Wednesday's global cyberattacks -- resurfaced on Twitter early Thursday, seemingly offering to help those whose files can no longer be recovered.

The altruistic gesture, even if it does prove fruitless, is uncharacteristic of the criminal syndicate that launched an underworld enterprise by placing powerful exploits in the hands of others to deploy as they saw fit. It may also simply indicate that Janus would prefer not to be tagged with the spread of "NotPetya" -- so named by Kaspersky Lab, which has itself sought to differentiate between Janus' ransomware and that which worked havoc across Europe this week.

There's consensus now among malware experts that NotPetya is actually a wiper -- malware designed to inflict permanent damage -- not ransomware like Petya, which gave its victims' the option of recovering their data for a price.