Tagged With tesla model x

Tesla drivers calls it “ICE-ing”, after the initials for internal combustion engine: It’s where gasoline- and diesel-powered vehicles block access to Superchargers as a way to... protest electric vehicles I guess? It has to be frustrating to be barred from obtaining the single thing your car needs to function, but it looks like Tesla owners are looking at new ways to fight back.

One of the key advantages of electric vehicles is not having to pay for petrol. This was particularly great for Tesla owners when charging stations were still free.

But for those who primarily charge at home on a daily basis, does it really work out cheaper?

Tesla recently crunched the numbers against the Model X 75D.

Tesla continues to slowly roll out more stores around Australia, and the latest is in SA -- the state that might just be Elon Musk's favourite, given the giant battery currently being installed there. The new Tesla store at Westfield Marion is, appropriately, more about renewable energy storage than it is about the company's electric car fleet.

Tesla's east coast Supercharger network will soon get you and your $100,000-plus electric supercar from Brisbane to Adelaide. Construction has started on two new locations in northern NSW that will extend the fast-charging range of Tesla's Model S and Model X north to Brisbane, and a station between Melbourne and Adelaide will keep South Australian owners (like Simon Hackett) happy.

If you'd dreamed of ordering yourself a Tesla and driving around the country without paying a cent for electricity, you'd better get your order in quick. With more and more of Tesla's Model S and Model X luxury electric cars appearing in driveways around Australia and around the world, the plucky little start-up from California has a plan to stop its fast-charging network of Superchargers from becoming clogged: it will stop offering free Supercharging to new owners from the start of 2017.

Today, Tesla starts selling the Model X in Australia. It's a $130,000-plus all-electric SUV that seats up to seven adults in comfort, can travel nearly 550km on a single charge, and can accelerate up to 100km/h in just over 3 seconds. Like the Model S, you can charge it for free at Tesla's network of Superchargers.

Where the Model S was based around a relatively simple concept, though -- a luxurious car built around a huge battery and electric motors -- the Model X integrates that technology into every door and panel. It's one of the most complicated cars you can buy, and you'll start seeing it on Australian roads soon.