Tagged With surveillance

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In its biannual transparency report, Apple revealed that it received a National Security Letter. But unlike other tech companies who have been ordered to turn over customer information to the FBI, Apple hasn't yet published the demand letter it received. Apple's transparency report also includes several new categories of government requests, an indication that the company is becoming more granular in the way it reports data about its interactions with law enforcement.

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The ever-expanding operations of Uber are defined by two interlocking and zealously guarded sets of information: The things the world-dominating ride-hailing company knows about you, and the things it doesn't want you to know about it. Both kinds of secrets have been in play in the Superior Court of California in San Francisco, as Ward Spangenberg, a former forensic investigator for Uber, has pursued a wrongful-termination lawsuit against the company.

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Trump thumbed his nose at the American people today by meeting with Russian officials as suspicions about his campaign ties to the country are at their peak. Adding insult to injury, the White House didn't allow any U.S. press to be present. But Russian press got a front row seat in the Oval Office and former intelligence officials worry that they may have smuggled in surveillance equipment.

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On Wednesday, stun gun maker Taser announced that it's offering free body cameras to every police department in the United States. That's 700,000 cops across 18,000 departments. Rebranding itself as "Axon" (as in the nerve fibres that connect neurons throughout the human body), the company said in a press release that it's "going 'all-in' to empower police officers" and will offer departments free cameras and storage for an entire year.

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On a recent trip to Disney World, I had an unusual experience. I rode a ride. It broke. We were evacuated, and a few minutes later, I got a picture on my phone. It was an empty raft sliding down Splash Mountain, taken at precisely the moment I was walking down the emergency stairwell. It was weird.

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Hey, remember US Congressman Jason Chaffetz, the guy who said poor people should stop buying so many dang iPhones if they want healthcare? Well, the dingus has done it again: During a congressional hearing about the US government's use of use of facial recognition technology on Wednesday, Chaffetz suggested using that same technology to track undocumented immigrants.

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On Friday, Mark Zuckerberg published an updated founder's letter for Facebook, his first since the company went public in 2012. Largely summarising the CEO's previous comments, the sweeping manifesto was newsworthy while containing little news. In at least one version of the text, however, Zuckerberg wrote about using artificial intelligence for online surveillance — a line stricken from the final draft.

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Twitter just announced that it's revoking a surveillance service's access to Twitter data. In September, the Daily Dot reported that the Denver Police Department was paying $US30,000 ($39,435) to use a tool made by Geofeedia that aggregates information from tweets and other social media. Today, the American Civil Liberties Union has even more information on how the tool was being used, prompting Twitter's action.

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In 2006, then-New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg issued an executive order establishing the Office of Special Enforcement, a citywide agency responsible for enforcing "quality of life" regulations — a nebulous, ideologically charged concept that refers to anything from music venues with too many noise complaints to nightclubs that facilitate prostitution to decrepit structures that pose a fire hazard.

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Our modern environment is saturated with wireless signals, a consequence of our insatiable desire to transmit data seamlessly and efficiently. A new device developed by scientists at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) can use these ubiquitous signals to detect our inner emotional states.

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Next week, Oliver Stone and the kid from 3rd Rock from the Sun plan to bring the story of NSA leaker Edward Snowden to a wider audience with the release of Snowden, their new You've Got Mail remake. Sadly, US Congress has yet to issue an official review of the movie, but the House intelligence committee released the next best thing with its report on Snowden himself and boy, is it a doozy.