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"In battle, the commander is the first one to go over the top," Joe McKinney, shirt unbuttoned, wearing a shower cap and one of those aeroplane neck pillows, exclaims over music swelling from every direction. He's having a great time, romping around San Francisco as part of a "distributed dance party" -- a roving DJ set controlled by an FM transmitter, beamed to dozens of boomboxes, and led by men who look like Road Warrior extras drenched in neon paint. One of them advises through a megaphone not to step on or trip over a homeless man in the path of revelry.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

"In battle, the commander is the first one to go over the top," Joe McKinney, shirt unbuttoned, wearing a shower cap and one of those aeroplane neck pillows, exclaims over music swelling from every direction. He's having a great time, romping around San Francisco as part of a "distributed dance party" -- a roving DJ set controlled by an FM transmitter, beamed to dozens of boomboxes, and led by men who look like Road Warrior extras drenched in neon paint. One of them advises through a megaphone not to step on or trip over a homeless man in the path of revelry.