Tagged With stars

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It's easy to feel small and insignificant in the grandiose scope of the universe, because we are. At the same time, as Carl Sagan once reminded us, we're made of the same "star stuff" as the cosmos. All too often, we forget how random, ridiculous, and resplendent it is to part of the stellar sorority of the universe. That's why art, specifically movies like Eliza McNitt's Fistful of Stars, is important — it reacquaints us with humanity's small and stupid and somehow very special place in the cosmos.

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The Sun and Proxima Centauri and most of the stars you've heard of orbit the centre of the Milky Way galaxy like children peacefully riding a carousel (with some weirdness caused by dark matter that we don't need to get into). Now, imagine if a few toddlers were sprinting and shrieking across the peaceful scene. Who sent these nightmares? In the case of stars, scientists think they could have come from another galaxy.

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On Thursday, May 4, Hubble dropped a "cute" press release comparing a new image of a galaxy cluster to the Marvel movie Guardians of the Galaxy: Vol. 2. It was a timely yet mega-dad corny way to make the image of the galaxy cluster Abell 370 seem relevant. While there's literally no connection between the James Gunn movie and the galaxy cluster, located roughly four billion light years away, that didn't stop literally everyone from trying to make this A Thing.

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When it comes to cool space pictures, supernovae get all the credit. After all, who doesn't love a good star death? But new images from the Atacama Large Millimetre/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile reveal a stunning star birth that gives those supernova snaps a run for their money. It looks just like a firework, and now I have that godforsaken song stuck in my head, because the internet has rotted my brain.

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The marital feuds of strangers have long intrigued our degenerate species. It's a timeless topic that keeps several magazines afloat, even if literally none of the details are true. But what most don't know is that celebrities (and commoners) aren't the only ones who get divorced — sometimes, actual stars do, too.

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Calling all space cadets: Today, a group of researchers led by the Carnegie Institute of Science released an impressive database containing 61,000 so-called Doppler velocity measurements of 1600 nearby stars. The team is graciously inviting you to use their data to find the next exoplanet. Go forth and become drunk with power.

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Perishing alone in space — in a gaseous cloud of stench — ranks pretty highly on the list of Terrible Ways to Die. Sadly, that was the fate of one unfortunate star trapped in the Calabash Nebula, nicknamed the "Rotten Egg Nebula" due to its high sulphur content. If you've ever smelled sulphur — or dog farts — you already understand the name.

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A long time ago in two galaxies far, far away, there was quite the kerfuffle. New research suggests that about 200 million years ago, the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of the Milky Way located 160,000 lightyears from Earth, got into an intergalactic altercation with its younger sibling, the Small Magellanic Cloud. But the best part is what came after.

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It's not often that a new body appears in the night sky — aside from meteors and the occasionally comet, things tend to look pretty much the same. Now, astronomers predict that a pair of stars so close they're basically touching will collide and create a so-called red nova, resulting in a bright explosion visible to the naked eye.