Tagged With sony nw-wm1z

Over the past few years, Sony has repositioned itself not as just a middling peddler of TVs and Blu-ray players and home audio gadgets like soundbars and Bluetooth speakers, but also the mass market leader in high resolution, super high quality personal audio devices. It's something the company has had credentials in since the original '70s Walkman, which genuinely revolutionised portable music in a way that wasn't equaled until the iPod.

Now, in 2016, at the 70th anniversary of Sony, the latest Walkman is the pinnacle of quality. That has culminated in a digital audio player that will cost you $4299 in Australia -- and that's before you buy an equally high quality and equally expensive pair of headphones.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Over the past few years, Sony has repositioned itself not as just a middling peddler of TVs and Blu-ray players and home audio gadgets like soundbars and Bluetooth speakers, but also the mass market leader in high resolution, super high quality personal audio devices. It's something the company has had credentials in since the original '70s Walkman, which genuinely revolutionised portable music in a way that wasn't equaled until the iPod.

Now, in 2016, at the 70th anniversary of Sony, the latest Walkman is the pinnacle of quality. That has culminated in a digital audio player that will cost you $4299 in Australia -- and that's before you buy an equally high quality and equally expensive pair of headphones.