Tagged With skyscrapers

When the world is descending into chaos, it can be hard to believe that optimistic visions of the future are within our reach. But personally, I think I've hit that point where escapist fantasy worlds of tomorrow are the only thing that can ease the stresses of our modern world. This 1923 illustration, for instance, is a picture that I'd just love to crawl inside of and pretend is real.

Video: This is very probably one of the scariest places you can park your bum: At the very edge of a corner of a very tall building in downtown Toronto. To make it even worse, Oleg Cricket, the guy in the video, decided it would be a perfect time to start spinning around while he's sitting too. I've never been so stressed out after watching someone sit down.

Video: Tall buildings often have tuned mass dampers hidden inside their structures to stabilise them against the wind. Those tuned mass dampers are huge and heavy and help limit a building's movement by swaying in the opposite direction of the building. That is, if the wind is making a skyscraper sway to the right, the damper will sway to the left to dissipate the kinetic energy, and reduce the, um, swaying. What's interesting is that the Burj Khalifa, the world's tallest building, doesn't have that.

Video: The 75-story Sulafa Tower skyscraper in the Dubai Marina is so tall that it's essentially above the clouds. So this guy is not just BASE jumping off a super high balcony, he's also jumping straight into a cloud of fog below. That thick blanket of mystery basically covers the world, hiding everything that's underneath it (namely: The ground). It's especially scary because a few seconds after he jumps, he's surrounded and blinded by the fog until the ground suddenly appears.

Video: Is riding a hoverboard onto the edge of a roof of a skyscraper in Dubai idiotic? Absolutely. It is very easy to fall off and lose control on one of those things and if you creep too far off the edge, either you or the hoverboard or both would be sent flying down towards the ground way, way below. That's not a good look. So don't copy this guy. He's even spinning around.

Video: When you see these climbers reach the top of Lotte World Tower, a 555m-tall tower that's the tallest building in South Korea and taller than One World Trade Center in New York, there's an ever so brief moment of peace. Wow, things look great from up here! And then it's back to the stress of watching someone do something as foolhardy as climbing a skyscraper.

Video: Shun Hung Square is a 384m tall skyscraper that's the third tallest building in Shenzhen, China. It's really, really tall. And watching the guys from On the Roofs climb it gets more and more stressful because they just keep going up. You think they have reached the top but there's still another level that's narrower and more dangerous and higher to climb.

Video: Flying a drone over Dubai? It's been done. Flying as a jetman all across the most famous buildings of Dubai? That too, has been done. It speaks to how nutty and batshit stunts have become (and how accessible it is for us to watch such nutty stunts) that normal nutty and batshit stunts can't be done anymore because well, they have been done. Here's something new though: Team Blacksheep flew a FPV Racer drone straight down the skyscrapers of Dubai. It feels like you're falling down to the ground (as opposed to just seeing majestic aerial views).

When you think of supertalls you probably think of pricey real estate -- not leafy parks in the sky. A new 300m tower going up in Manhattan provides a more interesting take: Hanging gardens that twirl down the exterior of the building like a giant green exclamation point marking the end of the High Line.