Tagged With security centre

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In the past several weeks, EFF has received many requests for advice about privacy tools that provide technological shields against mass surveillance. We've been interested for many years in software tools that help people protect their own privacy; we've defended your right to develop and use cryptographic software, we've supported the development of the Tor software and written privacy software of our own. This article looks at some of the available tools to blunt the effects of mass surveillance.

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North Korea tried and failed to hide behind the undisputed superstars of the hacker community last month when South Korea got hit by a large scale cyberattack. According to South Korea, Kim Jong Un and company worked hard to cover its tracks by hiding the IP addresses of computers used in the attacks and later destroying their hard drives. And when they got caught, they did what any dictatorial wasteland would: blame Anonymous.

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Graph Search is Facebook's bold new way of browsing the social network, letting you call up photos of your family in California, restaurants your friends like in New York, or any public updates from Gizmodo employees who also like hot air ballooning. It's been available the last several months in beta, but today it starts rolling out to Facebook at large. And in the wrong hands, it can be the ultimate stalker search engine.

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Despite the fact that the US government seems more enthusiastic than ever about gathering data, its taste for making it classified seems to be waning. This year’s Information Security Oversight Office report reveals that the total number of "original classification" decisions fell over 40 per cent in 2012.

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In a blog post today, Twitter announced that it was "experimenting with new ways of targeting ads", which is its way of saying it's planning to track you around the web — even when you leave Twitter — and relay that information to advertisers to craft better ads. Here's how to opt out.

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Email and phone call metadata certainly isn't private, but maybe you were holding out hope that good old-fashioned snail mail somehow avoided big brother's living gaze. The New York Times is reporting that's all being tracked too. Surprise, surprise.