Tagged With screen time

Apple and Google are falling over themselves to offer new native tools for tracking how long we spend staring at screens, unlocking our phones, and wasting time on social media. We’ve been testing the new ‘digital wellbeing’ tools in iOS 12 (which is currently in public beta) and Android 9 Pie (currently only available on Google Pixel devices and the Essential Phone), and here’s how you can deploy them to cultivate a healthier relationship with your phone.

As smartphones and other highly portable devices have become omnipresent, some researchers and many parents have begun to worry about the mental health risks of excessive screen time on kids and teens. New research presented this week doesn't debunk a link between technology and depression, but it could sharpen the reasons why it exists.

Rather than social isolation or any direct effects on the brain, the study's findings suggest, it's the lack of sleep caused by web-surfing or gaming that's most to blame.

Today's kids are better behaved than ever. They're having less sex (and more safely when they do), committing less crime, and doing fewer drugs. But research has also started to show they might be unhappier than previous generations of youths. A new study published today in Emotion adds more support to a leading theory on why that's the case: The rise of social media and smartphones in kids' hands.

In guidelines produced last year, parents were advised to limit screen time to one to two hours a day for children between the ages of two and five years. New research suggests these recommendations aren't producing the desired psychological benefits, and that the recommendations are unreasonably strict. But given how much we still don't know about the effects of excessive screen use on young children, there's still reason for concern.

KoalaSafe is a router with parental controls that lets you manage the time your child spends online, by creating a dedicated wifi network at home that you can set time limits on - as well as block inappropriate content and see usage analytics - using a smartphone app.

Alternatively, you could interact with your children, setting and enforcing boundaries yourself.

I'll take a bet that my almost-16 year old is watching YouTube in bed right this second. But according to the world's first long-term assessment of mental health effects from adolescents' late-night mobile use - I should probably stop him.

Touchscreen devices like smartphones and tablets are now fixtures of many households, so it comes as little surprise to learn that young children who don't work or go to school are among their most active users. In the first study of its kind, researchers have learned that infants and toddlers who spend more time on these devices sleep less at night. It's a troubling finding, but the reasons for these sleep disruptions are still unclear.

How much time should kids be allowed to stare into their screens like zombies? New guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics upturns conventional thinking on the matter, showing that a sweeping one-size-fits-all approach is not the right way for parents to go about limiting their children's screen time.

Increasing exposure to outdoor light is the key to reducing the myopia (short-sightedness) epidemic in children, according to ground-breaking new research by Australian optometrists.

Optometrist and lead researcher on the project, Associate Professor Scott Read, who is the director of research at QUT's School of Optometry and Vision Science, said that children need to spend more than an hour and preferably at least two hours a day outside to help prevent myopia from developing and progressing.