Tagged With roku

Alex Jones, chief of noxious conspiracy website and suspicious supplement sales front Infowars, was kicked off most of the web’s biggest platforms last year amid legal battles over his alleged harassment and defamation of mass shooting survivors’ families: Facebook, Twitter, Youtube, Apple, Spotify, and Pinterest, to name a few.

But recently, Digiday noted on Tuesday, Infowars somehow made its way back onto streaming service Roku.

It was a bit of a surprise earlier this year when Roku announced that it would be selling wireless speakers. The popular maker of platform-agnostic set-top boxes is certainly no stranger to home entertainment, but the idea that it would soon start to compete with Sonos, well, that seemed crazy. Having spent some time with the new soundbar alternative, I can say that Roku is doing something more intriguing with the Roku TV Wireless Speakers. It’s built a custom sound system that works curiously well with Roku TVs. The only downside is that the speakers don’t really work at all with any other TV or wireless audio system. Innovation is a weird beast, I guess.

If you’ve ever sat down to watch your imported Roku-powered TV and thought, “Boy I wish I had some imported Roku-powered speakers to enhance this experience,” you are in luck. The set-top box maker just announced a new set of speakers that work exclusively with Roku TV televisions. It’s kind of a curious move for the company, but it also makes weird sense.

If the term "smart sound bar" seems unusual, that's because it's brand new. TCL just announced the first in a new class of gadgets that act a little bit like a smart speaker and a little bit like a remote control that's powered by your voice. As the name implies, the new TCL Roku Smart Sound Bar is powered by the newly announced Roku Entertainment Assistant. Suddenly, everybody's favourite set-top box company does a lot more than make set-top boxes.

In recent years, set-top boxes have been shrinking down to tinier, cheaper packages with a growing list of fun new features. The new Fire TV dongle with 4K, HDR, and Dolby Atmos showcases some of the best aspects about this trend. It's cute. It's a thrill to use. It's just $US70. The only problem is that you still can't use the new Fire TV for everything. It's very good, but it's not the very best.

It feels like we're leaving the world of set-top boxes as we know them behind. For one, few people own a TV big enough that you could actually put a box on top of it -- that's been true for a long time. The box itself has also dwindled down to a dongle, a handy little thing that disappears behind the screen. These HDMI sticks have been a bit weak in the past, serving as a convenient but compromised alternative to a larger piece of hardware. The Roku Streaming Stick+, with its ability to handle 4K and HDR, changes all that.

If you're in the market for a dinky little black box to slide under your living room TV set and pipe through some quality content, you're in luck: there's lots of them to pick from. All the major names now have established boxes on the market. While Gizmodo is a big fan of the Roku box and everything it can do, it's not the only media box in town, and it might not even be the perfect box for you. So instead we compared the four major operating systems running in those boxes to help you sort out exactly which platform will best meet your needs.

Earlier this year, YouTube rolled out 360-degree videos. Like magic, they let you peer around in any direction from within the video. Now, one company is taking that futuristic video-viewing from your computer -- and bringing it to your much bigger TV screen.

I turn 30 this month, and it feels like I am one of the few people my age who watches pay TV and is willing to pay for it. Truth is, I hate watching shows on my computer -- or worse, my phone. Give me new episodes in real-time, on a real TV. I know I'm on the wrong side of history, but I also know I'm not the only one.

Roku was already the best little streaming device money could buy. But now, Google has gone and given Roku players access to all your Google Play movie and TV goodies. Which, more than just being an unprecedented move on Google's part, makes Roku pretty much unstoppable.

Something weird happened this morning. Something involving PVR-maker Roku and its plans for an "international expansion". One image in particular led us to believe the next streaming service to pop up in Australia, to be called "StreamCo", would be powered by the shiny Roku 3 box. But is it all just a big coincidence?