Tagged With raspberry pi

This decade we saw the smartphone move from overpriced gadget to something more necessary than a laptop or desktop. We saw the e-reader settle on a design so perfect it’s barely changed in seven years. We saw games systems that made us rethink how we game and laptops that made us rethink what a good laptop should look like. There were incredible wearables, and remarkable VR systems, and drones so well designed practically anyone can fly them. Below are the most innovative gadgets of the decade—the ones that will continue to matter long after the devices themselves become obsolete.

Turns out a tiny Raspberry Pi was at the source of a big headache for NASA. An audit released by the NASA Office of Inspector General on June 18 reveals that an early 2018 cyberattack utilising one of these mini-computers resulted in a hacker making off with restricted documents.

There have been countless Raspberry Pi builds over the years that have sought to cram the little boards into a handheld device. Yet nearly every single one required not just a basic grasp of coding, but also an understanding of soldering and sometimes a touch of electrical engineering. Adafruit’s new PyGamer looks like a perfect alternative for people who want a handheld system they built on their own.

Off-the-shelf gadgets are all well and good - easy to set up, reliable in operation, powerful and smart - but where's the adventure? We're living in a golden age of gadget-making, as these DIY projects prove. Save yourself some money and learn more about the ins and outs of electronics by tackling one (or more) of these yourself.

First answer: it's easier to buy one. And that's cool. But there are people who, given a Raspberry Pi, a 3D printer and a stick of chewing gum, are going to build their own facsimile running emulation software so they can play whatever they like. Christopher Foote is one such person. The fruits of his labour: the "PiSwitch".

You can stuff your Raspberry Pi into just about anything, but if you want to draw eyes and solicit comments from visitors or, you know, generally geek out, you could carve up a steampunk-themed enclosure, complete with glowing lights, gears and ornate markings. Like uh, this one.

If you like the idea of the Amazon Echo, the Google Home, or the Apple HomePod, but you'd rather not spend any money on any of them, would prefer to control as many of the variables as possible, or just want something fun to do over the weekend you can build one at home for yourself by repurposing an old phone, tablet, or Raspberry Pi you've got lying around.

With some 30 years of video gaming history now behind us, there's never been a greater choice of retro games to dig back into, whether it's on your smartphone or a classic console rebooted for modern times. For the more serious seekers of gaming nostalgia, there are plenty of hands-on projects you can attempt yourself, and these are some of the best we've found. So prep your wallet, brush up on your coding and handyman skills, and get ready to build.

There's something about combining LEGO and old Macintosh computers that is just irresistible for hobbyists. The latest edition to the canon is a cute little version of the Macintosh Classic from 1990 that uses a Raspberry Pi and an e-ink display to make it partially function. Best of all, you can have one on your desk because its creator has detailed how he built it.

I can't remember a time when I wasn't obsessed with retro video games. That's one of the reasons I was so excited about the NES Classic Edition; it's also why I spent my Thanksgiving documenting how to put together a Raspberry Pi-based mini SNES instead of brining turkeys.

But building an emulation console from scratch takes time, and I was curious if there was a more streamlined, turnkey solution. That's when I happened across a Kickstarter for the Allcade 64-bit, a Raspberry Pi 3-based system in a housing that looked just like a classic Nintendo 64 cartridge. It promises all the cool hackery Pi-vibe with none of the command line or soldering.