Tagged With oculus rift

Virtual Reality is tech's biggest question mark. Could it become a mainstream medium, like movies or video games, or something completely different? A lot of people have tried and failed to answer that question, and while Intel's VR Happy Hour at the New Museum on Tuesday is no exception, roleplaying as a tree and directing a monster is a pretty entertaining way to spend two hours.

Today at its annual Build developer conference, Microsoft announced its own set of motion controllers made for its burgeoning Windows Mixed Reality platform. As we've mentioned in previous reports, the company is calling its new computing platform "mixed reality" because it combines different elements of augmented and virtual reality. The platform itself is baked directly into the Creators Update for Windows 10.

Virtual reality has been around for decades, but it's only of late that the technology has properly matured with reliable consumer-grade headsets, room-scale tracking, high quality touch controllers and a library of games worth exploring.

So now that people can get into virtual reality in a range of ways - from mobiles to consoles to the top-end headsets - what's changed? Here's everything you need to know about VR.

Virtual reality is great and all, but it needs a little more space -- especially if you're using a room-scale HTC Vive. And that probably means you're going to want to set up your powerful VR gaming PC in an open area like your living room. And that means you're going to want a PC that can hide out of the way in your TV cabinet. Enter the MSI Trident, the world's smallest VR-ready PC.

Video: Admit it. Deep down inside there's a part of you that will always love watching people fall down, and it's overjoyed that virtual reality is making a comeback. Even if the Oculus Rift and other VR devices don't change the world as promised, at least we'll have videos of people falling on their faces while trying to virtually rock climb.

2016 is the year that VR is actually getting good. You can click a few buttons on the internet and a Vive or a Rift will appear on your doorstep a few days later -- although you'll have to pay through the nose -- for your gaming PC, which is more powerful than ever. Or you can buy a PlayStation VR instead.

Or, down at PAX Aus in Melbourne in November, you can try all three -- in a dedicated 'VR Freeplay' area, with three-directional treadmills that let you walk around in virtual reality.