Tagged With moon

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Most people (wrongly) assume the moon is barren and boring. Sure, our satellite might be a little clingy, but it also has moonquakes, orange soil, and could be hiding abundant water resources. New research from satellite data offers more evidence that the Moon does indeed have water trapped in its mantle, which could be huge for companies looking to mine the Moon for resources. Still no word about where the cheese is, though.

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Low-budget sci-fi movies may have had their heyday during Roger Corman's rise to B-movie greatness in the 1950s, but they're still going strong today — proving that you don't necessarily need lavish special effects to tell a really great story. Here are our favourites from the past few decades.

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For decades, scientists have wondered if frost persists inside the dark and cold craters of the Moon's poles. The recent discovery of unusually bright areas near the Moon's south pole suggests this very well may be the case. But as a potential source of water for aspiring lunar colonists, the quantity of this surface frost may come as a disappointment.

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Good news! Three space telescopes, including Hubble, have combined their celestial powers to spot a moon orbiting a dwarf planet in the Kuiper Belt — the region beyond Neptune where Pluto and countless other icy bodies live. According to NASA, the dwarf planet's moon has a lot to teach scientists about how moons formed in the early solar system — but sadly, it has no name. Its planet's name, on the other hand, is garbage — 2007 OR10 and its satellite friend desperately need some rebranding.

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Saturn is having a moment. Today, NASA announced that one of its moons, Enceladus, has the key ingredients to support microbial life. Around the same time, NASA's Cassini spacecraft dropped some jaw-dropping images of another one of Saturn's quirky moons, and while this one may not have a subterranean ocean, it sure is an adorable little pasta.

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We're all a little uncoordinated at times, but when you're a hunk of metal hurling through space, the consequences are a bit more severe. This week, NASA's Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN), which has been orbiting the Red Planet for two years, had to perform a last-minute manoeuvre to avoid a disastrous collision with Mars' moon, Phobos. NBD, though.

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On Monday, SpaceX founder Elon Musk announced that for the first time in history, it will be sending two private citizens on a trip around the Moon, in a Dragon 2 spacecraft. Because sending untrained civilians into space apparently isn't enough of a gamble, Musk added that this mission would be taking place in Q4 of 2018. As an added reminder for emphasis, that's next year. Another reminder: SpaceX has yet to send any humans into space, period.

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Earth has some battle scars from back in the day. When the solar system was still young and wild, roughly four billion years ago, Earth, its Moon and Mars were attacked by a series of asteroid assailants. It's long been assumed that the space rocks involved in the assault — called the Late Heavy Bombardment — are now floating around in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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Earth's very clingy friend, the Moon, has long been an object of human fascination. It makes sense, considering we're just a hop, skip and a 384,400km jump from our celestial pal.

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The general scientific consensus is as follows: early Earth collided with something roughly the size of Mars, chipping off a bit of our planet which would become our Moon. But there's new research to suggest the Moon was formed by a whole bunch of tiny collisions instead, over millions of years, with the fragments eventually forming the Moon we see today.

The researchers say this would explain why the Moon appears to be composed largely of Earth-like material, rather than a mix of Earth and another planet.

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Today, Donald Trump wrapped up a meeting with Rice University professor and historian Douglas Brinkley. According to members of the press pool following the president-elect, the crux of their conversation revolved around "a man going to the moon". Naturally we must ask ourselves: Does Trump know the US has done that no less than a dozen times?

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Going to the Moon is officially hip again, thanks in no small part to Google, which is offering $US20 million to the first private company that can land on our nearest neighbour, roll around a bit, and beam images back to Earth. The latest contender for that sweet sweet X-Prize money is Japan, which has just obtained a launch vehicle for the shiny metal cheese grater rover it plans to send to the Moon late next year.