Tagged With microsoft mixed reality

I've never had the best experiences with VR. Previously, the only time I didn't feel immediately sick was during the Evangelion ride at Universal Studios Japan. Which is weird because it's a rollercoaster.

I once nearly vomited during The Vanishing of Ethan Carter and that's basically just a walking sim.

Suffice to say, I was nervous about trying HP's Mixed Reality headset. And what I found was a pleasant surprise.

In an infamous Twitter meme that misquotes Alan Moore's Watchmen, Dr. Manhattan, naked, blue, and seated in a crater alone on Mars, says: "I am tired of Earth. These people. I am tired of being caught in the tangle of their lives." He's a perfect candidate for Windows 10 Mixed Reality, Microsoft approach to virtual reality, that, starting today, is compatible with SteamVR.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

VR, like that one cousin on Facebook, can be hard to love. The potential is there, and you have all these fond memories -- mainly rooted in cool science fiction books you've read -- but in reality VR is pricey, buggy, and kind of limited to one experience: Games. Yet Microsoft has been making a lot of low key noise about VR, AR and mixed reality recently, and how it can be more than a tool for fragging aliens.