Tagged With maps

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It can be hard to look for the bright side in a tragedy. But resolving tragedies often requires an immense amount of human effort, and that effort results in new knowledge. New genetic forensics techniques emerged from the identification of 9/11 victims, for example. Another tragedy, the disappearance of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 three years ago, is starting to yield its own benefits to the scientific community.

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If there's one thing on Earth we don't know enough about, it's the ocean. We've only mapped around five per cent of the seafloor, and two-thirds of the ocean's animal species might remain undiscovered. It shouldn't be a surprise that we're only now able to create detailed maps of the seafloor — but that doesn't stop each new one from being mind-boggling.

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Here's a uselessly amusing idea to wrap your head around: What if history's largest empire, the British Empire, still existed today? What would it look like? How many countries would it include? How many people? What would they look like? Would the Sun really never set?

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Video: If you're a map nerd or a history buff or someone who likes to travel or just a person who enjoys learning new things, the latest video from Wendover Productions is an absolute delight to watch. It's a quick tour of all the countries in the world (this is the first part, so exactly half the countries show up) filled with totally random but fun facts about each country.

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Video: A 17th century map was found in a chimney in Scotland and then delivered to the National Library of Scotland crumpled inside a plastic bag and basically destroyed. Just unravelling the fragile, centuries-old map seemed impossible enough, but the team at the National Library managed to figure out a way to salvage and restore it.

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Hooray. If you live south of the Equator or in any of the countries that light up green in the map above, you're good. Keep on living there because you don't squat next to any nuclear weapons. But if you're in the countries painted red — like the United States, Germany, Russia, China, India and so on — you might live closer to a nuclear bomb than you think.

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One of the less noticeable changes ushered in with iOS 10 was the introduction of extensions for Apple Maps. Just like the Photos extensions, it lets apps get their hooks deeper into Apple Maps and appear as options that look like integrated parts of the app. Here are the best ones you can use so far.

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Image Cache: As the US election nears, America can at times feel like a hideous and hateful place. Let this map of the United States' river basins made by Imgur user Fejetlenfej remind you that, at the very least, it can be beautiful. Fejetlenfej — a geographer who sells their maps on Etsy — created the image using QGIS software, which is an open-source geographic information system. The map depicts both "the permanent and temporary streams and rivers," the creator explained. They divided the streams into catchment areas, which show when rainfall flows into a river, lake or reservoir. Using the Strahler Stream Order Classification, which is a system used by geologists to define stream sizes, Fejetlenfej explained that on the map, "the higher the stream order, the thicker the line".

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In Bing Maps, a street view at the corner of Pennington Avenue and Hazel Street in Baltimore's Curtis Bay neighbourhood shows a single police car, two officers and what appears to be a man in the middle of the street bleeding from the skull.