Tagged With magma

The more moving parts a machine has, the more likely it is to eventually fail. It’s an especially problematic rule of thumb for aircraft given the fact that a mechanical failure during a flight can be catastrophic. To help remedy this, a British aerospace company recently tested a unique plane that replaces its wing’s adjustable ailerons with powerful blasts of air to steer the craft.

[image url='https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/t_original/oju6ok5d5tg8qmirttfh.jpg' size='xlarge' licence='Photo: Getty Images' caption='Satellite image of Mayotte island in the Indian Ocean.

(Photo: Getty Images)' align='center' clear='true' ]

On November 11, 2018, a deep rumble ricocheted around the world, one that humans couldn’t feel but that registered quite clearly on seismometers. A new pre-print paper about the event is now suggesting that it was caused by the largest offshore volcanic event in recorded history.

At the end of the Cretaceous era, a large meteorite ploughed into what is now Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. The collision set off a chain reaction of environmental calamities that likely contributed to the demise of the dinosaurs. New research is now adding to the list of ensuing catastrophes, suggesting the collision cracked our planet's seafloor like an egg, forcing magma to pour out along the ocean's tectonic ridges.

You know about the potentially world-ending supervolcano hiding under Yellowstone, right? Well, scientists just discovered a second magma chamber containing an additional 46,000 cubic kilometres of molten rock. Did we mention it's "overdue" for eruption?

This is the Tolbachik volcano, laying down roads of magma over the Peninsula of Kamchatka for condemned Russians to drive on their way to hell in cars equipped with dashcams. At least, that's what it looks like in Lusika33's photographs. It's truly pretty -- in a Mordor kind of way.

Good old geothermal plants generate power using water heated by hot rocks deep underground. But what if we could get energy directly from the seething magma down below? In Iceland, an accidental discovery let scientists actually stick a pipe into magma to test this idea -- and the results of their experiment has just been published.