Tagged With macbook pro

September is just around the corner, and so is Apple’s annual spring event where it announces a stream of new products. Earlier leaks have hinted at a three-camera array for the new iPhones, but it also looks like we’ll see some new iPads, and the biggest MacBook Pro in years, according to a Bloomberg report. In any case, here’s a rundown of what to expect once Apple Day rolls around.

Apple killed a laptop that had a lot more fans than I expected last week. Around the Gizmodo office, my colleagues groaned when news broke that following a refresh of its laptop line, there would no longer be a standard MacBook Pro without a Touch Bar. Apple, in their eyes, was going all in on the little touch-sensitive OLED strip above the number pad, and it was a travesty.

Pricing has always been the Apple MacBook's toughest selling point with many having to take into account whether design and experience outweigh cost. For many, the entry-level options were a great place to start but Apple has since announced it's tweaking its basic offerings in both price and specs.

There hasn’t been an Apple product as universally maligned and hated as the company’s low profile butterfly keyboards since the Newton PDA. Introduced in 2015 to help MacBooks achieve thinner designs, even Gizmodo staffers have had keys on their laptops that broke, or inexplicably just stopped working.

As a result, the company expanded its Keyboard Service Program to fix any problems, and even upgraded the keyboard’s materials; but 2019 could actually see Apple finally switch to a better scissor switch design.

Apple is on the verge of perfecting the low profile keyboard, and so far, it’s only taken them three tries and an endless repair program to get here. The fourth attempt can be seen in the latest version of the MacBook Pro, which our friends at iFixit recently tore down. The key design in this generation of very expensive laptops is new. Does it work? Don’t know yet.

About a week ago, the “a” key on my MacBook Pro broke. Once flat and useful, the poor little guy now looks like a mini ski slope and barely works. Several of my friends have similar keyboard problems on their overpriced laptops. So it felt like a relief earlier today when Apple announced an expansion of Keyboard Service Program. Now, the company will repair pretty much any MacBook Pro with the problematic “butterfly mechanism” for free. Apple even announced a design upgrade that will hopefully ensure new keyboards don’t break. Good job, Apple.

The never-ending saga surrounding Apple’s newer MacBook keyboards just saw a slightly refreshing update. In a leaked internal memo, the company says that all keyboard repairs must now be done in store with a one-day turnaround. So if you’ve been putting off getting your sticky or unresponsive keys fixed, now’s the time to make a Genius Bar appointment.

You are in the market for a laptop. You are aware that Windows and Chrome OS laptops are cheaper and are now just as well crafted and designed as Apple ones. You do not care. You want an Apple laptop. As an avowed user of the platform for 20-plus years, I support this decision to spend more money than you should to use a wonderful OS on some nicely designed hardware. But the question is which laptop do you buy?

After being long overdue for an update to new CPUs, last week Apple announced refreshed 2018 MacBook Pros with 8th-gen Coffee Lake chips from Intel, including the company's top-of-the-line consumer laptop processor, the six-core 2.9GHz Core i9-8950HK CPU. And in theory, this option seemed like a great addition to the MBP lineup by giving high-level video editors and graphics artists a little extra performance without any added bulk.

Apple finally pulled the 2015 15-inch MacBook Pro from its store. This marks the end of the dongle-free MacBook Pro, and now only the super-outdated MacBook Air, which you shouldn’t buy anyways, still has ports besides USB-C. Headphone jacks aside, Apple just moved one step closer to being a USB-C only laptop shop.

Software updates are exciting. I keep telling my friends this, and when they get behind on their updates, I’m all, “Hey, you’re missing out on good stuff!” This is part of the reason why I’m sometimes the guy who downloads beta versions of software. The bugs are annoying, but hey, the features are better.

This approach recently backfired on me with macOS and iOS 12. Unexpectedly, I think the resulting disaster made me a better computer user.