Tagged With lego

I'm OK with roller coasters as long as they make no attempts to flip me upside-down, which usually limits my rides to loopless wooden coasters. But if you can't even line up for a coaster without getting queasy, maybe riding along on this monstrous, 90,000-piece Lego replica will let you experience the thrills of a roller coaster without the nausea. Hopefully.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

After a brief holiday hiatus, Toy Aisle makes its triumphant return with an exclusive first look at a new collectable from DC Comics that fans of The New Teen Titans will want to start saving for. We also have the easiest way to build your own ship-in-a-bottle courtesy of LEGO, and something for Star Trek: Discovery fans looking to recreate epic Federation vs. Klingon space battles at their desks, instead of actually working.

This definitely isn't the first incredibly detailed Lego crane we've ever featured, but Dawid Szmandra's 1:24-scale Liebherr LR 11000 literally towers over previous creations. With the boom fully raised, the model stands just over 7.3m tall, and weighs in at a hefty 27kg. But most impressive is the fact that it can actually lift and move furniture around.

Dr Maria Parappilly is an award winning Physics Educator and Research Section Head for STEM Education at Flinders University. Her pioneering teaching innovations have been recognised with state and national awards, and internationally with the only international D2L Innovation Award in Teaching and Learning. The chair of Physics Education of Australian Institute of Physics, this year she joined the South Australian Women's Honour Roll for 2017.

She's also worked out how to keep physics students from dropping out - with Lego.

As tragic as it is to accidentally drop an elaborate Lego creation, it can also occasionally be quite cathartic to watch thousands of plastic bricks shatter in all directions. But I'm glad it was David Windestal and his crew who went to all the trouble of building this 3,152-piece Lego Super Star Destroyer before completely obliterating it on a 108km/h rocket sled.

Video: There are some typing enthusiasts out there who are very, very picky about their keyboards. They will go to great lengths to customise every last feature and function so it feels perfect under their fingers. Or, in the case of LEGO master builder Jason Allemann, they will instead use the world's most famous plastic bricks to create a truly unique typing experience.