Tagged With kindle

No one needs a $399 ereader, but the Kindle Oasis is often good enough that you can convince yourself otherwise. Its display and backlight are better than average, and its asymmetrical design is purpose-constructed for the avid reader. Though it’s got its detractors, I’ve always liked it. I read a lot, and I love ereaders.

Spending $200 more than I need to for the very best has felt like the kind of luxury I can safely budget for. The third generation of the Kindle Oasis, which isn’t very different from the last generation apart from having a backlight with adjustable warmth. So you might feel you can budget for this one as well.

Earlier today Amazon announced its a revamp to one of its entry-level devices.

Named the All-New-Kindle, it sure is a Kindle.

Summer is now officially here. For me that means butchering countless mangos with my trash knifeskills and playing Daryl Braithwaite's One Summer on repeat.

Summer break is also a time where my fellow colleagues and I like to catch up on some of the books that have been piling up on our shelves and Kindles for months/years.

Here's what geeky reads you'll find us getting into our eyeballs.

Shared from Lifehacker

I have to admit that I don't do as much reading as I'd like but I have found that being able to carry books on my tablet has helped immensely. When I travel, being able to bring two or three new books and comics along help pass the time on a long flight. Amazon has a Spring sale on Kindle books with titles from well-known authors seeing for less than a cup of coffee.

For a few years, the Voyage was Amazon’s flagship e-reader. While it was never cheap, its 300 PPI resolution and fantastic design often made it a better buy even after Amazon released the first Kindle Oasis in 2016. However, it seems time and the emergence of the second-generation Kindle Oasis have put an end to the Kindle Voyage’s run because after supplies of Kindle Voyages dried up, it seems like the Voyage is being discontinued.

I'm not terribly fussy about how I read. I used an old Kindle Keyboard until a stray pen in my backpack broke its display, and I've long happily used a Paperwhite without so much as considering the fancier Kindles Amazon has released since I got it back in 2013. Hell, half the time I'm just reading on the Kindle smartphone app for a few minutes here and there between glances at my email. So the new Kindle Oasis, the company's most advanced reading gadget yet, is not designed for me. But goddamn, it's great.

When Amazon released the Kindle Oasis back in the spring of 2016, we said it was the best e-reader ever made. But that doesn't mean it was perfect, and in the year and half since it came out, it's become clear there was room for improvement.

With a starting price of $449, the old Oasis was a bit pricey, it had a blocky (and now outdated) design and it was missing features like the adaptive backlighting found on the even older Kindle Voyage. And despite having a name that immediately conjures up visions of pools and fountains, the previous Oasis didn't have any sort of water resistance either. But now, Amazon is giving it another go with the simply (and annoyingly) named New Kindle Oasis, which looks to address all those shortcomings while also adding a number of new improvements too.

Over the next month, I'll be spending upwards of 90 hours in the air, and probably just as long sitting in airport lounges and standing in queues -- I travel a fair bit for work. I always have a laptop and a couple of phones with me, but juggling them all is a pain. I find it much more relaxing to switch everything off and put it away, except for one phone I have filled to the brim with movies, books, music and podcasts.

Amazon is building a new version of its artificially intelligent Echo speaker with a screen, according to a Bloomberg report. The device is currently being worked on by the company's secretive Lab126 research team that was also responsible for some of Amazon's greatest flops and successes like the Fire Phone, Echo Dot and Fire tablet. It sounds weird and kind of unwieldy -- but it might prove to be a great idea.

Amazon's all-you-can-eat Kindle Unlimited subscription service for e-books is finally available in Australia. $13.99 a month will get you access to any of a million different Kindle titles on your e-book reader, or iOS or Android phone or tablet.

The Kindle e-reader has been with us in one form or another since 2007, and it's still going strong. It's a super simple device, and for most people, that's a huge part of its appeal. But don't let its simplicity fool you into thinking there aren't any interesting tweaks you can make to your beloved e-reader. Here are 10 of our favourite Kindle tweaks that make reading anywhere even easier.

Amazon has just announced some nice improvements to the cheapest Kindle. The price is still crazy good at $US80 ($107), and the battery still lasts for weeks. (It also still has a middling 167 ppi display.) But it's also thinner, lighter and now comes in black and white.