Tagged With kindle

I'm not terribly fussy about how I read. I used an old Kindle Keyboard until a stray pen in my backpack broke its display, and I've long happily used a Paperwhite without so much as considering the fancier Kindles Amazon has released since I got it back in 2013. Hell, half the time I'm just reading on the Kindle smartphone app for a few minutes here and there between glances at my email. So the new Kindle Oasis, the company's most advanced reading gadget yet, is not designed for me. But goddamn, it's great.

When Amazon released the Kindle Oasis back in the spring of 2016, we said it was the best e-reader ever made. But that doesn't mean it was perfect, and in the year and half since it came out, it's become clear there was room for improvement.

With a starting price of $449, the old Oasis was a bit pricey, it had a blocky (and now outdated) design and it was missing features like the adaptive backlighting found on the even older Kindle Voyage. And despite having a name that immediately conjures up visions of pools and fountains, the previous Oasis didn't have any sort of water resistance either. But now, Amazon is giving it another go with the simply (and annoyingly) named New Kindle Oasis, which looks to address all those shortcomings while also adding a number of new improvements too.

Over the next month, I'll be spending upwards of 90 hours in the air, and probably just as long sitting in airport lounges and standing in queues -- I travel a fair bit for work. I always have a laptop and a couple of phones with me, but juggling them all is a pain. I find it much more relaxing to switch everything off and put it away, except for one phone I have filled to the brim with movies, books, music and podcasts.

Amazon is building a new version of its artificially intelligent Echo speaker with a screen, according to a Bloomberg report. The device is currently being worked on by the company's secretive Lab126 research team that was also responsible for some of Amazon's greatest flops and successes like the Fire Phone, Echo Dot and Fire tablet. It sounds weird and kind of unwieldy -- but it might prove to be a great idea.

Amazon's all-you-can-eat Kindle Unlimited subscription service for e-books is finally available in Australia. $13.99 a month will get you access to any of a million different Kindle titles on your e-book reader, or iOS or Android phone or tablet.

The Kindle e-reader has been with us in one form or another since 2007, and it's still going strong. It's a super simple device, and for most people, that's a huge part of its appeal. But don't let its simplicity fool you into thinking there aren't any interesting tweaks you can make to your beloved e-reader. Here are 10 of our favourite Kindle tweaks that make reading anywhere even easier.

Amazon has just announced some nice improvements to the cheapest Kindle. The price is still crazy good at $US80 ($107), and the battery still lasts for weeks. (It also still has a middling 167 ppi display.) But it's also thinner, lighter and now comes in black and white.

Today Amazon introduced the Kindle Oasis -- the eighth generation of Kindle -- "crafted from the ground up for readers," Amazon says. It is 30 per cent thinner and over 20 per cent lighter than any other Kindle, and includes a charging cover that delivers "months of battery life".

You can put an Oasis on pre-order in Australia today for $449, and Amazon says it will start shipping in the coming weeks. Here's what it can do.

As entertaining as the internet can be, who has time to read all of it? Even employing the services of a read-it-later app such as Instapaper or Pocket can make catching up on articles difficult. What you need is a dedicated reading device, free from social media pings, email alerts, and other distractions -- and that's where Amazon's Kindle comes in.