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Despite our squabbles here on Earth, the universe is full of so much beauty it's almost stupid. Jupiter is perhaps the most unreasonably beautiful thing in our entire solar system, and it's not shy about flexing. Recently, citizen scientists/JunoCam superstars Gerald Eichstädt and Seán Doran created one of the most incredible enhancements of a Jupiter pic we've ever seen. It's rare that Jupiter out-Jupiters itself, but here we are.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Praise Cthulhu! NASA's Juno spacecraft has just delivered the most incredible images of Jupiter's Great Red Spot -- and that's a really high bar to clear. The spacecraft has spent the last year beaming back some of the most mind-blowing images of the gas giant. But today's batch marks a historic moment for the orbiter, which got closer to the Great Red Spot than ever before on Monday, July 10th. Although all Juno pics are ethereally beautiful, these Great Red Spot snaps just absurd. Seriously, how dare you go and be this beautiful, Jupiter.

There's no drama quite like space drama. And Juno's flight to Jupiter has been about as dramatic as a sci-fi thriller can get. Last October, Juno's engine system malfunctioned, causing NASA to delay the orbiter's planned approach into a 14-day "science orbit". This February, NASA decided to forego the science orbit engine burn entirely, keeping the spacecraft in its much longer 53.5 day orbit. But today, we're finally getting some good news.

Sure, things are pretty whacky here on Earth, but they're nothing compared to the gigantic storm twice as wide as our own planet raging on Jupiter. The area just west of Jupiter's Great Red Spot is both dazzling and chaotic, filled with swirling clouds of mystery. Now, thanks to NASA's Juno spacecraft -- and a very skilled citizen scientist -- we have the most high-res image of this region ever.