Tagged With infrastructure

It was a cool day in Dallas last November, when a small quadcopter lifted itself off the ground of an American Airlines hangar and buzzed towards a Boeing 777. The drone, a DJI Mavic Enterprise, had been outfitted with a spotlight, but otherwise looked a lot like what you might see your neighbour flying in the backyard.

The remarkable difference was that this particular aircraft had been programmed to inspect the hull of the much larger aircraft, the jet. It could do in a matter of minutes what it would take a maintenance crew hours to do. It was, in its own way, a tiny flying robot with a job.

The Federal Government have committed to a 10-year national infrastructure plan that seeks to reduce congestion, improve safety and create jobs. However, according to Australian Automobile Association (AAA), the funding for transport infrastructure has declined by almost $2 billion over the forward estimates compared to last year's budget.

If you've ridden the New York City subway, you know the feeling. You buy a flimsy plastic card that lets you ride the train, and when you try to swipe it at the turnstile, it doesn't work. You swipe again. The machine asks you to swipe again. You swipe again. The machine asks you to swipe again at the same turnstile. This can go on for hours, until you beg an MTA employee to let you through. That's the cursed MetroCard experience, and as of this week, its days are numbered.

Back in 2013, the sky was the limit for Tesla and Elon Musk was promising a low-cost 90-second battery swap at charging stations in the future. Since then, reality has set in and those plans seem to be on hold. What's the next best solution for those long charging times? Maybe put your feet up and grab a $1 coffee.

On Tuesday, The New York Times decided to reignite the age old debate of walking versus standing on escalators. And do you know what the paper concluded? "You shouldn't walk on escalators." This is a patently incorrect conclusion for at least four reasons.

Midtown Manhattan -- with its noise, traffic, slow-moving tourists and overpriced everything -- is the one place most New Yorkers avoid at all costs (if they can help it). It's also home to Trump Tower, a gargantuan gold-plated phallus jabbed straight into the city skyline where the President-elect is planning on spending weekends during his term in office.

In May 2013, a bridge spanning the Skagit River along Interstate 5 in Washington state catastrophically collapsed, after an oversized trailer clipped one of the bridge's cross beams. A new analysis by engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign confirms the many factors that contributed to the collapse, and offers recommendations for how to prevent similar failures in the future.