Tagged With hdr

You’ve got your hands on a shiny new 4K television set, or a 4K computer monitor, or even a smartphone with a 4K screen... so where’s all the 4K content at? It can sometimes feel like its impossible to find good looking stuff for your brand new display. From the TV makers, to the set top box manufacturers, to the streamers, no one is making it super easy to find this stuff. But don’t worry, we’ve got some tips for making it a little simpler to find.

Many people know Vizio as the cheap flatscreen TV they owned in college. And indeed, the company has always sold very decent displays for very low prices. That formula is evolving with the new P-Series Quantum. This $US2,200 65-inch 4K LED TV is undoubtedly out of reach for most students. But, Vizio claims, the P-Series Quantum delivers the performance you’d typically see in a $US4000 TV. After spending three weeks with the TV, I’m inclined to agree.

Shared from Kotaku

One of the great joys of a PC setup is symmetry. Everything is synchronised. The space is clean. Organised.

That's true for monitors too. Monitors must be the same size. Everything must be even. Ordered.

But there's a good argument for throwing that logic out the window.

It's not your fault, but it is very likely that you're using the wrong HDMI cord to plug that 4K Apple TV or PS4 Pro into your new TV. While you might have assumed that all HDMI cords are equal they are, unfortunately, not. And if you have the wrong cable, you could be missing out on the best features of your TV - or whatever you're trying to plug into it. No HDR, no wide colour gamut, no high frame rate for your sports and games. But don't worry. If you know what to look for, it's actually pretty easy to find the right cable.

Apple has some catching up to do in the streaming wars, and today's announcement of the latest Apple TV firmly positions it as... a way to watch 4K videos through iTunes. That's the big news, but there were a few additional bits of info that might convince you to give it a chance.

There's some pretty crazy high-end tech on the floor of Computex in Taipei this year. Chief amongst them are two new monitors that take the absolute best tech from high-end TVs and cram it into desktop-friendly sizes, although the price tags will probably put any other peripheral you could ever think of to shame. If you're cashed up and ready to frag, the Asus ROG Swift PG35VQ and the Acer Predator X35 are equally worthy of your attention.

In the market for a brand new, shiny, smart TV? The good news is that there's more excellent choices out there than ever; the bad news is that working your way through all the options can take up precious time you could be spending binge-watching Westworld. Let us ease your purchasing headaches and point out what to look for.

Webcams aren't quite the must-have accessory they were in 2010. Now every laptop and tablet has a camera on the front, ready and willing to broadcast your multitude of chins out onto the internet. But the webcam fattening the bezel of your laptop has some pretty severe limitations, ranging from lack of flexibility to quality. If you're a serious streamer, or addicted to Skype, you'll need something more. Logitech thinks it has made that something.

Shared from Lifehacker

Netflix has declared 2017 the year of High Dynamic Range (HDR) programming. The popular streaming service has already dramatically expanded its 4K HDR content - and there's a lot more to come in the months ahead.

Last year, we were invited to check out the company's state-of-the-art colour correction suite in New York where Netflix Originals receive a fresh lick of digital paint in the HDR conversion process. Here's everything we learned.

Back in my day, there was only one HDR. You tied an onion to your belt, which was the style at the time, and you bought a TV that said it could play HDR video. You found a HDR Blu-ray or a HDR video on Netflix or YouTube, and you watched it. But these days, you kids, with your fancy fandangled Dolby Vision and Technicolor and your Hybrid Log Gamma...

If you have a new (and probably quite expensive) 4K HDR TV, then 4K video is amazing -- it looks incredible. But to watch a 4K Blu-ray, you need a 4K Blu-ray player, which can set you back quite a few hundred dollars more than regular Blu-ray. If you do want to make that investment, though, the cheapest 4K Blu-ray player actually does a lot more than just play movies. You can buy a 4K-toting Xbox One S for as little as $349, a full $200 cheaper than the least expensive Blu-ray player on sale in Australia today.

There's a moment playing Infamous First Light, as the heroine made of light climbs up a wall in pitch black darkness, that I fully appreciate the hype around the PS4 Pro. The woman is a multicolored bundle of light particles and thanks to HDR, I can make out each particle and note the way they each cast their own vibrant glow on on the red brick wall. Normally, she'd be a big blob of light, but high dynamic range gives you details in moments of extreme brightness and extreme darkness. I'm watching the next big step in video games, and it is extraordinary.

YouTube, the second most popular website on the internet, has the ability to effect change and the adoption of new technologies in visual mediums like no other website. In the past it's used that ability to good use. It was an early adopter of 4K content and continues to possess the largest repository of said content. The same is true of 360 video. Now YouTube is finally embracing HDR, which means newer videos are going to get a lot more realistic looking.