Tagged With GPS

Do you know where you’ll be on April 6, 2019? If you heavily rely on GPS, you may not be able to determine where you are when that date rolls around. That’s because GPS navigation technology was originally built with a short-sighted timekeeping system that will reset next month and has the potential to cause chaos.

This week, hitman and hobbyist runner Mark “Iceman” Fellows was convicted of the murders of English gangland figures Paul Massey and John Kinsella. Among the crucial pieces of evidence in his trial was a Garmin Forerunner — a GPS-linked fitness watch that tied Fellows to pre-assassination reconnaissance on one his targets.

If you’ve ever been out with a big group of friends and tried to rely on text messages to get everyone back together, you already know what an act of futility that can be. “Head to the bar!” “Which bar?” “New phone, who’s this?” The LynQ tracker promises to make rounding up your posse a lot easier. It works similar to a compass, but uses GPS to point the way to a specific person, instead of true north.

The most useful place for a voice-activated digital assistant isn't your office, kitchen, or living room. It's in your car, where your hands and eyes should be pre-occupied with driving. So Garmin put Amazon's Alexa in a new bare-bones navigation device that will ensure you'll never get lost, and never get lonely, on a long drive.

A staggering report from The Texas Observer describes a scheme that allegedly preys upon immigrants recently released from ICE detainment centres. Libre by Nexus, a Virgina-based company that reportedly brings in more than $US30 million a year, offers to help detained immigrants by arranging for their bail to be paid by bondsmen. Upon their release, however, the former detainees are stuck paying hundreds of dollars a month in "monitoring" fees unrelated to the money owed for their bonds, potentially trapping them in debt indefinitely.

I ordered it on eBay. When the four-ounce envelope arrived from New York three days later, it looked innocuous enough. It contained a finger-sized black plastic box, a small black antenna to screw onto that box, and two glass fuses. It was designed to fit into a car's 12-volt electrical socket -- that thing that used to hold a cigarette lighter.

The average GPS satnav is a boring rectangular affair that will stick out like a sore thumb if you tried to mount one to a scooter. But just because you drive a curvaceous classic Vespa doesn't mean you won't ever get lost, so TomTom has created an adorable circular satnav designed to complement your scooter.

Polar's new M600 is a full-on Android Wear smartwatch. While there are already plenty of smartwatches that incorporate heart rate tracking, Polar's technology, which uses six LEDs and a custom-developed algorithm, has always been deemed one of the most accurate. So if you're an avid runner who can't be separated from their email inbox, the M600 might be the fitness-focused smartwatch you've been looking for.

Garmin's GPS dog tracking system has some new features that take puppy wrangling to an extreme. For example, the new Astro 430 -- a GPS and Glonass dog tracking handheld that can track up to 20 dogs at a range of up to seven kilometres, and is capable of updating their location every 2.5 seconds.