Tagged With google pixel

Google appears to be done with two phones that were the company's signature devices just two years ago. Ars Technica pointed out that the Pixel and Pixel XL have now disappeared from the Google Store and Project Fi store. Google confirmed to Gizmodo that the devices will no longer be made available to purchase directly from the company.

Despite all the hype and hoopla for Google's "first" homegrown phone, the Pixel was met with a lukewarm reception when it launched back in the spring of 2016. It wasn't very pretty and its build quality wasn't great either, and it often suffered from a host of issues. But the most frustrating of these problems was that a number of Pixels shipped with a defective microphone, which made it difficult for people to use their Pixel as an actual phone.

After a couple of weeks of reported drama with the Google Pixel 2 XL's 6-inch OLED display -- manufactured by LG, rather than industry leaders Samsung -- in everything from viewing angles to screen burn-in, Google has said that it'll push a software update to fix things.

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Early this morning, Google pulled back the curtain on a suite of new products at their event in San Francisco including the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, new Google Home products, a 2-in-1 notebook and earbuds. If you were peacefully sleeping during the announcements - I don't blame you - and you can read about all the new products coming to Australia, right here.

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Google has lifted the lid on their newest smartphones - the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL - at their event in San Francisco this morning and detailed the changes they've made to their flagship phones. There aren't too many big changes, but under-the-hood, the Pixel 2 is a different beast than its predecessor. If you're planning on grabbing a Pixel 2 or a Pixel 2 XL, here's everything you need to know, including Australian pricing, release date and specifications.

With Apple's September event over, you'd be forgiven for thinking we were done with big phone launches this year. But it is not so. The last big hurrah for this year is Google's very-not-very-secret announcement of the new Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, scheduled for early tomorrow morning.

On release, the original Nexus was the go-to Android device if you wanted bang-for-your-buck. Sadly, its successor, the Nexus 5X, couldn't quite follow in its footsteps and with the Pixel, it appeared Google had abandon the Nexus moniker... and its price-to-power reputation. However, sources talking to XDA point to the return of the Nexus, though whether it's tied to actual hardware is another question entirely.

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Eight months on, and Google Pixel is still one of the best Android smartphones on the market. This is in large part due to innovative software features like Assistant and inbuilt unlimited cloud storage for photos and video. If you're still using an older handset, you can get most of the Pixel's big, best features with a few clever tweaks.

Google needs to be in the hardware business. It's infiltrated nearly all aspects of our lives to an alarming degree. It controls our emails through Gmail, knows where we go through Maps, has a list of every person we communicate with via Android, and understands our every interest thanks to its search engine and Chrome. Yet it's gonna hit a wall soon. A company as large as Google can't infiltrate every point of the human experience with software and services alone. It needs to be producing the phones we text on and the computers we browse on.

Over the past 52 weeks, a lot of gadgets great and small have crossed my desk here at Gizmodo. Here are 10 of my favourites -- pieces of technology, hardware and software, that have changed my life for the better.

It was only a matter of time, really. Netherlands-based developer "Chainfire" posted the above photo yesterday showing the fruits of his labour: the Pixel, successfully rooted -- after a bit of trial and error, of course. All the remains is to prepare the root for public consumption.

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Few of us would dare to crack open electronic goods to see what’s inside in fear of never being able to put them back together again. Luckily, iFixit specialises in gadget teardowns and it busted open the Google Pixel XL to investigate the guts of the new smartphone in order to assess just how easily it would be to repairable it.

Google Assistant is not intuitive. Gizmodo reporter Michael Nunez found that out the hard way when he tried to arrange a romantic date with it. I had less lofty goals when I played around with Google Assistant. I just wanted to see how well it stacked up to Apple's Siri. While Google's AI bot is extraordinary in some ways, ultimately, it's still a very dumb digital assistant that fails to live up to its own hype.