Tagged With google home

Google Home and Chromecast devices are reportedly killing peoples' Wi-Fi. The problem, first reported by Android Police, originally seemed localised to users of the Google Home Max speaker (unavailable in Australia) and the cheap, but usually excellent, TP-Link Archer C7 router. However since Android Police first reported the problem, it seems to have spread to other Google devices and TP-Link routers.

It seems inevitable that one day your entire home will be wired so that smart assistants can hear your every request, no matter where you are. But if you mostly rely on a smart speaker, its built-in mic can only eavesdrop so far. Companies like Google would certainly love it if you bought a smart speaker for every room in your house, but a better solution is to just make your Google Home portable with a fancy pair of battery pants.

Predicting the future is near impossible -- but that doesn‘t stop us all from having a red hot go. Human beings have been predicting the future since the beginning of history and the results range from the hilarious to the downright uncanny.

One thing all future predictions have in common: they‘re rooted in our current understanding of how the world works. It‘s difficult to escape that mindset. We have no idea how technology will evolve, so our ideas are connected to the technology of today.

Thanks in large part to the low-cost Echo Dot, Amazon grabbed an early lead in the smart speaker space. But this spring Google hit back hard with the Home Mini, which has become the best cheap smart speaker to buy for most people. Unfortunately, shortly after its launch, a bug affecting the top touch controls in some Home Minis caused Google to disable the feature in order to prevent its device from recording audio at all times.

Shared from Lifehacker Australia

Google Home is an artificially intelligent digital assistant that responds to your voice commands in a variety of ways. Nine months after its debut in the US, it is finally available to buy in Australia - complete with a dinky-di accent. If you've just set up your Google Home and aren't sure what to ask it, here are 57 commands and questions to get you started.

Australians are historically early adopters for most technology - particularly smartphones, and Siri. But when it comes to having our Google Home Assistant, or Amazon Echo's Alexa picking up some milk and bread for us - turns out we just aren't that keen.

It's almost unfair that most of the world met our voice-controlled future in the form of an Amazon Echo. Sure, the gadget works, but damn is it ugly. The Google Home was better but still sort of silly-looking. That's why the sleek, minimalist Google Home Mini feels like a revelation.

With all the glitz of Google's October event last week focusing on the new Pixel 2 phone, it was easy to miss two other announcements: a new miniature Google Home speaker called the Home Mini (and a big one called the Max), and a pair of Bluetooth earphones called the Pixel Buds that pack in some Google Assistant AI smarts. If you're wondering when they're coming to Australia and how much they'll cost, this is where you find out.

Shared from Lifehacker

Early this morning, Google pulled back the curtain on a suite of new products at their event in San Francisco including the Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL, new Google Home products, a 2-in-1 notebook and earbuds. If you were peacefully sleeping during the announcements - I don't blame you - and you can read about all the new products coming to Australia, right here.

Even though it feels like we're still processing all of Apple's latest devices and announcements, it's time to switch gears and prepare for what's coming on the other side of of the smartphone divide. That's because Google's big fall event is less than a week a way, and it's going to have important news for anyone who cares about Android, smartphones, Chromebooks and anything else Google can figure out how to puts its digital assistant in.

The smart speakers are coming! Wandering into our living rooms, listening for our voice commands, pulling random bits of trivia from the web, spitting out weather forecasts, and controlling a growing number of home appliances. But they're always listening and currently there isn't an easy to way to know when they aren't (apart from hitting a mute button). So how do you stop TV ads, young kids and dumb roommates from controlling your speakers and revealing your most intimate secrets?